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Discuss Types Of Hackamores (Full and Detailed with Photos) at the Tack & Equipment forum - Horse Forums.

I realised when I looked up types of Hackamore on google that nowhere really does ...
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    Types Of Hackamores (Full and Detailed with Photos)

    I realised when I looked up types of Hackamore on google that nowhere really does a full detail of hackamores and their useage, I hope that by posting on this site that is public people will see this and learn more about them! This is all from research and personal experience with them so if I get something slightly wrong do not freak out please.

    I will update as I find out more!

    They only put up the categories - English, Bosal/Western, Indian and Mechanical. How helpful is that when you want to know the different strengths and uses and different types from each category?!

    So I thought I'd make on myself in the hopes that when people are looking for hackamores they'll see this, also to stop people putting the hackamores SO LOW DOWN ON THE HORSES FACE!! It's all I see on google, no wonder they have such a bad name for being 'severe'.

    Let's first take a look at the horse's Skull -

    The bone sticking out from the face is the nasal bone, the gap underneath is where the nasal passages and nostrils are, so if your hackamore or noseband (especially a grakle they always seem to be ill fitted!) sits on that bone your horse will be in serious discomfort, even pain and you could break their nose.

    Ok so here goes -

    A Hackamore should sit where the noseband sits, a bosal hackamore sits lower because the heavy underneath lifts the top up so it sits higher than a normal hackamore. If you put the hackamore too low it will push on the soft part of the nose and cause your horse discomfort and eventually pain, also means if you have to yank you can break your horses nose! So please make sure you know where to put the hackamore before you use it!

    The English Hackamore - A straightforward and 'gentle' hackamore used for horses that are not strong to ride, basically an upgrade of riding in a halter, they have short shanks that you attach the reins too for extra control and is very soft on the horses face.


    The 'Mechanical' Hackamore -
    A mechanical hackamore is any hackamore with shanks and a curb, the German Hackamore is the most well known version. Some are Western, some are not.

    The German Hackamore - A very straightforward hackamore with a curb, long shanks mean good brakes and steering, it is one hackamore than has the strength of a pelham in terms of control, I ride my very own headstrong nutter in one! You barely need to twitch your hands to turn either way or stop, but it can be yanked on if the situation calls for it as long as in the correct position, reccomended for stronger horses. Do not use on sensitive horses as they can be heavy. As you can see here his hackamore was slightly too low, it was put up a hole before we finished the session as it was a bit loose.


    Nueles Hule Hackamore - A thinner hackamore used to exert more pressure to the face than to the poll, for horses who stick their noses out when they ride, not as strong as a german hackamore.


    Jim Warner Hackamore - Used for serious competition or starting young stallions, generally used in Western Riding. The rope nose is for added control as it moves with the horse.


    Barnsby Competition Hackamore - Used for horses competing for added steering and control, good for showjumping (doesn't have to have fluffy cover on nose piece but it is good too!)


    Lady Bug Hackamore - Restricted movement of the shanks means a slight twitch is more forceful to the horse, meaning you have but to twitch your hand and the horse goes left or right, used for extra steering power.


    Continetal Hackamore - The continental is a shorter version of the german hackamore for closer pressure to the face instead of the poll.


    The 'Little S' Hackamore - Used for steering more than control, used alot in barrel racing and endurance and can be used in any discipline, good for ponies.


    Show Hackamores - Show hackamores are just ornate versions of regular hackamores to catch the eye in the show ring.


    Hackamores without shanks - These hackamores are very straightforward for horses that are easy to control, gentler than hackamores with shanks they are generally used in endurance or jumping for novice horses or horses who are just very well behaved.

    The Flower Hackamore - Used in endurance generally the flower hackamore has different rings for different levels of control, applying more or less all pressure to the poll and not the nose, not for a fiesty horse!


    The 'Jumping' Hackamore - Though this is called a jumping hackamore, the relativeness to jumping is zero to none! It is basically an upgrade from riding in a halter as you cannot compete in one, mostly the same pressure points and control as a halter, except the rings are lower down.


    Floatation Hackamore - The floatation hackamore is all about poll pressure, the ring moves around under pressure and pulls on the horses head, a bit stronger than a flower hackamore.


    Combo Hackamore - This nylon hackamore is for anyone who rides in a halter, you simply attach it to the bridle like a noseband and use it as if you were riding in a halter, also has a halter ring on the underside so if you wish to get off and lead you can.

    See below next post for western hackamores and indian hackamores.
    Last edited by BladesOfGlory; 04-13-2012 at 03:28 AM.
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    Onto the Western Hackamores which I will expect will be everyones favourite part here!

    The Scissor Bosal - The scissor is one of the most well known hackamores, generally used for starting and showing horses under the age of 4 years old as when they become 4 you can change to a bit under show rules. All about poll pressure the rawhide hack sits low on the horses face, the knot on the underside has special reins attached to it and is of medium strength, the rawhide is slightly flexible so it won't hurt the horse if you need to haul back when it spooks. There are 4 types, the Scissor, the tie down, the rope and the mechanical, the mechanical was made for English riders who wanted to use a bosal on their horse originally. Hope Jaisie doesn't mind that I've used her wonderful mare as a model!
    Scissor Bosal -

    Tie Down or Flexible Bosal, softer on horses face but not as strong, for use after starting with a scissor or combined with a bit -

    Rope Bosal - A Rope version of the Scissor Bosal, softer on the horses face but not as strong, for use after starting with a scissor -

    The Mechanical Bosal, medium strength generally for english riding -


    The Loping Hackamore - The loping hackamore is a more sensitive version of the original Scissor Bosal, used for stronger horses.


    The rope hackamore - Generally used by parelli enthusiasts the rope bridle is a parelli halter with reins attached, not for the faint hearted as it is only a small bit stronger than your average halter.
    Yet again using Skye as a model for this!


    The Rope Bridle - The rope bridle is a stronger version of the halter/hackamore featured above. It has cross ties under the chin for added pressure and control aswell as steering.


    The Rope Bridle/Halter Combo - A relatively new creation this is for anyone whose horse does not neck rein yet they wish to ride them in a parelli halter, metal rings on each side give two different places for your reins, under the chin or either side of the nose.


    Now this isn't exactly a western hack but had nowhere else to put it, this is a type of show hackamore originally made for arabian horses, easy to medium strength for well behaved show horses.


    Now onto the Indian Hackamores

    The indian hackamores are derived from the first ever hackamores created, the native americans barely ever put anything but rope/rawhide in their horses mouth and would only put rope in their mouth to go into battle to have extra control.

    The Indian Bosal - This has a thick noseband for added pressure to the nose and criss crosses under the horses jaw for extra control, easy to medium strength not for strong horses. Indian horses were never bolty or strong so none of these are a good idea for a headstrong horse.


    The War Bridle - The war bridle is as it's name suggests, a bridle used for war, there are two types, one is with a headpiece that tightens when the reins are used, one is just a rope through the mouth and tied under the chin, they are both medium to strong strength and better for a stronger horses but still very easy to lose control with if the horse is not properly trained.
    Here my horse models the mouthpiece war bridle -


    A headpiece war bridle diagram, no pictures are clear enough


    I will touch on a few more later but for now enjoy!

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    Awesome and so informative/educational. Thanks!!

    Don't forget about my favorite type of sidepull. Ergonomically designed for STABILITY on the head (no twisting as you use each direct rein) and comfort/effectiveness and clear/direct signals with NO LEVERAGE.




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    Haha thank you I haven't finished yet, still have bitless bridles like the one you showed to get too! Hard work haha found out alot through my research though!

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    Awesome! Very informative! Thank you!

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    Thanks! Glad people like it!

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    THANK YOU! I love this, thanks for taking the time!. I like the look of the jumping hackamore.

    where do you suggest nosepeices should be? I read somewhere they should fall about 2 inches below the cheekbone?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oklassic View Post
    THANK YOU! I love this, thanks for taking the time!. I like the look of the jumping hackamore.

    where do you suggest nosepeices should be? I read somewhere they should fall about 2 inches below the cheekbone?
    Thank you! So do I funnily enough as I love riding in just a halter! I'm just waiting right now to get a lightweight hackamore for my more sensitive horse and then all of mine will be bitless

    I always take it as 2/3 fingers from the end of the protruding part of the cheek bone depending on the size of the horses head and the size of your fingers, same as a noseband or a halter should fit

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    Very nice post, and welcome to the forum!
    One note though, you said something about leverage with the jumping hack. There is no leverage on sidepull/jumping hack. It works by direct pressure because the reins attach directly to the noseband.
    I've always heard/called the English hack a jumping hack, and a jumping hack a sidepull (though I have heard the names you use before). Interesting to see how terminology varies by area.
    ETA: I love how you mention the risks of breaking the nose with mechanical hacks. I don't think many people realize how much damage you can do with a metal core noseband mechanical hack with 8 inch shanks, something I see a lot of in the 4-H barrel racers. People often have a very rosy view of hackamores. While many are very gentle, an equal number are just as harsh, and often harsher than many bits.
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    Thank you! And ok then haha I'd never seen one before so just took what it said on the description, said it had a small bit of poll pressure due to being thinner than a halter and the rings being lower down than on a halter. My mistake thank you for that I shall correct it. Oh yes haha the English Hack is the correct name for the first hackamore where as I think possibly the jumping hack is the American name for it? We also do not have the terminology 'side pulls' here at all haha.
    After watching people with hacks too low down and their horses ******** out I couldn't not mention it, when you google them they are all in the incorrect place, most people put them so the metal parts go where the bit goes!! I'd like to see them wear their glasses that far down without getting hurt. It's the same with bits, any bit can be harsh when the hands that use them are harsh. Yet strong bits get a bad name because people use them incorrectly then call them harsh! Same with the mech hackamores!

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