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Discuss teaching a horse not to run away with you at the Horse Training forum - Horse Forums.

Dancer had this problem, I don't have him anymore but if the problem comes up ...
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    Senior Member+ BirdieGirl's Avatar
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    teaching a horse not to run away with you

    Dancer had this problem, I don't have him anymore but if the problem comes up again I want to know what I can do to fix it. For those of you who ride, when you run does your horse normally try to get its head and go faster? Or does he just do what you tell him to do? I've only ridden one horse, and that was Dancer. So I'm used to keeping the reins tought so he wouldn't run away with me. Do you all have to do that while running? I mean a majority of you. I need reasons NOT to be afraid of riding, a horse trying to run away with me is a big reason for me to be afraid. I'm not a good rider, I want to know what I might be getting myself into by getting another horse.
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    Senior Member+ UnDun*'s Avatar
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    Take one rien, only one to one side. A horse CANNOT physcially run off and grab the bit if it's head/neck is bent to one side. I dont mean grab the bit and haul on it, but if you sense your horse is going to grab the bit from YOU, take the bend.
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnDun*
    Take one rien, only one to one side. A horse CANNOT physcially run off and grab the bit if it's head/neck is bent to one side. I dont mean grab the bit and haul on it, but if you sense your horse is going to grab the bit from YOU, take the bend.
    Or he tries to keeps running, but can't see where he's going, and trips, taking you both down.... I used to think the one rein stop was a great idea till that happened to someone I know.

    BirdieGirl- I would guess riding with constant contact probably made the problem worse A horse that feels like he can't escape the bit is more likely to try to evade the bit, and if bolting once got his head, he may have kept trying to bolt to escape the contact. Just a guess.

    Once a horse has his head up and is bolting there's very little you can do- the bit is off the bars of the mouth so pulling your reins is useless. When Regal gets frustrated and lifts his head starting to surge out, I release contact with his mouth and add leg, which makes him want to bring his head back down, and as soon as his head drops and the bit is in a place to have some control again, I take up contact and half-halt him back down to a steady gait.

    Would it be possible to get some riding lessons before getting another horse? I know how frustrating it can be to not know how to deal with problems!

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    Senior Member salemvot's Avatar
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    You have to know how to deal with a runaway horse. Even the best horses can get spooked and run away with you. I don't like the one rein stop as it can (though rarely) cause a horse to fall. I prefer to teach my horses to stop on both seat and leg cues as well as voice command (I use "Whoa") I won't go out of the arena on a horse that won't respond flawlessly to either command.

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    Exclamation

    none of my horses run away but i have experianced many that do!!!

    i must admit it's not a very plesant feeling, being carted off with.

    you should really give and take, some horses respond very well to this by having just a nice contact, then applying pressure with 1 rein, usually that will work, but with some you need to sit down deep in the saddle, and hold but half hault at the same time, sitting down deep into the saddle is one of the main thingst that will help slow the horse down!!!!

    kelly
    horziez

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    Senior Member+ BirdieGirl's Avatar
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    I think I'm just scared I'll get another horse like Dancer. When I squeezed with my legs I believe he thought it was a que for him to go even faster. And while on the trails on of the ladies there told me to give him some slack instead of keeping tension in the reins. As soon as I let go Dancer lowered his head, but took off. Not at all a full out run, not even close. But I realized that giving him his head was not what I wanted to do on a naughty horse in an area I'm not familiar with. I think what I need to do is ride a horse that is totally kid-safe and that'll be a big confidence booster for me, my last ride wasn't a good one. Thanks much, it was kind of a stupid post since I don't even have a horse to try the techniques on, I'm just anxious to get another horse and try riding again. Like I said, I just really hope I don't get another Dancer...I love him, but he drove me nuts...
    Jetta and Tucson: Golden Retriever and 2005 APHA Gelding
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    Actually, if you think about the way horses see, turning their head to the side would give them a better view of where they were going. But, turning the head too abruptly can cause the horse to fall, especially if they are stiff an unbalanced. Which is why I tell all my clients that they can never do enough one-rein stops with their horses, because the more you do and the softer and more flexable your horse gets, the better chance you have of getting their head around at a full blown gallop.

    I would suggest trying to find a horse that is calmer and a little easier for you to handle, but you should also take some lessons or ride with someone that can help you, because there is really no such thing as a kid safe horse. Any horse can take off, buck, rear or spook, even the "kid safe" ones.
    In the quiet light of the stable, you hear a muffled snort, the stamp of a hoof, a friendly nicker. Gentle eyes inquire, "How was your day old friend?" and suddenly, all your troubles fade away.

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    Senior Member+ BirdieGirl's Avatar
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    I know all horses spook, but even if I just had one ride that was all good I'd feel all macho, ya know? and for me that helps, because I'll feel like "If I did it then, I can do it now." I know that's stupid, it's not how I should feel, but having a confidence boost helps me relax and feel safer. When Dancer freaked out I let another more experienced person ride him and I rode her horse. While her horse was very rotten when it came to me trying to turn her, she was good and it boosted me a lot so I could work with Dancer again and not be totally afraid.
    Jetta and Tucson: Golden Retriever and 2005 APHA Gelding
    Not many people are lucky enough to find their soul mate.
    I was lucky enough to find two of them.

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    Senior Member Trixiesue's Avatar
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    I am not much for the one rein stop either, I think if a horse wants to go forward turning his head won't stop his legs from going straight, or the worst case they fall (ouch)
    I too would look for a more suitable horse that is better trained for your level of riding, and one that will help boost your confidence!

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    The one rein stop is an emergency brake, a horse has a lot harder time running fast, bucking or rearing when not in a straight line. That's why reacehorses run straight and why jockeys pull back.

    Anyway, Birdie, I am not saying that you shouldn't ride a safer horse to get your confidence back, I absolutely think that you should! What I meant though, was that I think that you should enlist the help of a trainer that can help better your riding skills and help you learn how to gain control of a horse that is a little bit more than you can handle.
    In the quiet light of the stable, you hear a muffled snort, the stamp of a hoof, a friendly nicker. Gentle eyes inquire, "How was your day old friend?" and suddenly, all your troubles fade away.

    -Author Unknown


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