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Discuss Spur Training - or Spur Stop at the Horse Training forum - Horse Forums.

Ok the title pretty much says it all- Now I dont want this to get ...
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    Spur Training - or Spur Stop

    Ok the title pretty much says it all- Now I dont want this to get into a heated debate or any arguments. I would also prefer that it stay on topic.
    Thanks

    Pretty much I want to hear everyones thoughts on Spur training/spur stopping.

    I only know a bit about spur stopping and Im also wondering different variations as far as a spur trained horse is cued.

    I really just want to learn a bit about it, we have a horse in training right now, and so I will be learning to ride a spur trained horse, but I am currently debating if this is something I want to use with Skip.

    I know the advantages- so what are the disadvantages-
    How much does it differ from a horse that isnt spur trained?

    Pretty much enlighten me

    Also a little note- I searched for threads on this topic and couldnt find any
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    My horse is trained to spur stop, but he stops without the spur stop as well. I really don't know much about the training, and the pros & cons, I just bought him that way, I thought it was pretty cool though. lol.
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    Senior Member kristenc812's Avatar
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    I've trained my horses with a spur stop..I mostly like it because I feel that if keeps them back on their haunches when they stop. However, I do like to hold the reins and make sure they stay in a frame so that they don't throw their weight to the front and poke their nose out as they stop.

    That's just my opinion..it works best for my horses.

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    I accidentally trained mine to spur stop.

    Basically because for a while, I "clenched" to stop, and didn't realize my heels were setting against him.

    Anytime I have ever applied a spur to any horse, I can feel them clench slightly. I've yet to feel one "elongate" It is natural. So it makes it easy in reality to do it

    What I use spurs are is for change. change in direction, change in something. Not for speed, not for more go. I have other cues for that.

    When I want to turn, I have one spur on. Sometimes a side of a foot on the other side to "encourage" certain kind of bending.

    But for a hard stop, both spurs are set at the same time.

    We've been trying to work away from it, into a full "release" the legs the horse stops. And I've been working hard to do it on Sage and not teach her to spur stop.

    Blister will stop with or without spurs,

    advantages are more for the show ring. You don't have to exaggerate your legs to get a stop. Basically what I'm aiming for with Blister, Spurs on together for a normal stop, complete release for a sliding stop. Two different kind of stops. And so far it has been working ok before I had to lay him off for the past year and a half.
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    Senior Member kristenc812's Avatar
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    Yeah, BW..My horse steers off of my legs as well. Also, I show on the APHA circuit so having a spur stop keeps the signals neat and tidy for equitation classes. :]

    I've considered switching to the full release of the legs but the spur stop is so engrained in my head that I think I would end up teaching a spur stop anyways. Haha!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blistering Winds View Post
    I accidentally trained mine to spur stop.

    Basically because for a while, I "clenched" to stop, and didn't realize my heels were setting against him.

    Anytime I have ever applied a spur to any horse, I can feel them clench slightly. I've yet to feel one "elongate" It is natural. So it makes it easy in reality to do it

    What I use spurs are is for change. change in direction, change in something. Not for speed, not for more go. I have other cues for that.

    When I want to turn, I have one spur on. Sometimes a side of a foot on the other side to "encourage" certain kind of bending.

    But for a hard stop, both spurs are set at the same time.

    We've been trying to work away from it, into a full "release" the legs the horse stops. And I've been working hard to do it on Sage and not teach her to spur stop.

    Blister will stop with or without spurs,

    advantages are more for the show ring. You don't have to exaggerate your legs to get a stop. Basically what I'm aiming for with Blister, Spurs on together for a normal stop, complete release for a sliding stop. Two different kind of stops. And so far it has been working ok before I had to lay him off for the past year and a half.

    I dont use my spurs for speed either, I also use them for change.

    I guess Im just in a jumble cause I dont know if a spur stop would be a positive thing for Skip.

    I show of course, so I can see where it would be beneficial.

    Part of me is wondering if it would help us a bit- when he is good, he's good but he has his moments. Sometimes he will ignore my cue for downward transitions (lope to jog, or lope to walk) and thats just him being a brat.

    Im thinking that a spur stop would help prevent some of this. And keep him listening to my cues.

    Several girls I show against have horses that spur stop, and also have a cue with the spur to go slow- Im not sure if this is slight pressure or a different cue.

    Thanks for the posts though you guys. Keep em coming
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    Senior Member kristenc812's Avatar
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    Yes, my horse also has a slow down, squeeze button. To train your horse you have to use your hands to act as a reinforcement for your legs.

    So, say you want to teach your horse to slow down with a squeeze. In the beginning, squeeze and close your hands on the reins. You have to decide what "kind" of signal works best for you. For me, I tend to give a stronger signal with my inside leg to help keep him "up" and I squeeze a bit lighter on the outside leg. So just keep repeating this squeeze-pull..but gradually change from doing both at the same time to giving a squeeze first. If you don't get a response, then you can go to your hand.

    Anyways, I hope some of that made sense and that you can use it. For the stop, squeeze stronger but equal with both legs but using the same method as above. Good luck!
    "Success is how high you bounce once you hit the bottom." George Smith Patton

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    Yes it does make sense thanks =)

    What I was attempting last year was to cue him to go slow from a squeeze with the calves but Im thinking I need a stronger more direct cue.

    I guess I will keep waiting for peoples responses.

    Like I said Im on the fence about putting a spur stop on Skip just cause he stops really well with the cues I do use.

    It never even occured to me to use a cue with the spur for slow. I guess I will have to figure something out-

    I dont want to start changing things around too much and really confuse him before next show season. (If I started training him to spur stop)

    The major thing that deterrs me from it is how many people Ive seen with their downward transitions from lope to walk actually come to a complete stop- then walk off which is considered a break of gait- and is supposed to be faulted. I placed under a girl that did this- and from what Ive been taught is its incorrect.

    I dont know but I cant wait for more responses on this subject. XD

    Lol not that it matters cause I cant ride right now - this is making me want to go ride...
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    I have never trained for a spur stop, but the QH mare I leased two years ago now, was trained to do a spur slow down... Clench both legs against her side and she'd slow down immediately, you just kept asking with both legs until she slowed to the speed/gait you wanted. For a stop, you sat deep and released all leg and she'd stop.

    The negative I've heard from people in regards to having a horse trained with a spur stop, is that it's more challenging to ask them to do other things with your leg and not have them stop or slow way down. I have not ridden through a spur stop or tried to train it, so I have no personal viewpoint ... I will be interested to follow the thread as it progresses.
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    I absolutely LOVE it!

    my riding backround started in hunters so naturally when I switched to western the concept of stopping the horse with my legs was insane. But the first time I rode a spur trained horse I knew I would never go back. I have ridden western horses trained both ways..and to different extents. Some have just been spur stop and others have been completely spur trained meaning speed was also controlled w/ spurs.

    I will NEVER have a horse w/o it. If you are riding western it can be a lifesaver. I do mostly pattern classes and I dont know how I would be able to do a NICE clean pattern w/o having a spur trained horse. There is nothing prettier than a pattern without moving your hands.

    My preference is a completely spur trained horse. My current horse is kind of a mix. He is leg/spur trained. Meaning sometimes you dont use your spurs but use your calves to slow/collect him.

    it has also saved me a few times when my bridle came loose and all I had to do was stop him with my legs.

    I will always be a strong advocate for spur trained horses. I think if your going to show it is almost necessary. Now I have ridden a few nice pattern horses that wernt spur trained but it is rare that you have a horse that 100% of the time wont fake you out when you say whoah..or wont throw his head when you stop him w/ your hand/seat.

    I do agree it can be overused but I think it is becoming less and less common with all of the new rules in AQHA.

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