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Discuss Previcox for the Navicular horse at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.

MY guy has mild navic and he was on previcox for a while - it ...
  1. #11
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    MY guy has mild navic and he was on previcox for a while - it didnt work for him as well as bute does.
    MUD FREE - I'm lovin' it!!!!!!

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    I'm not giving up right now, but if hes going to continue to be bad (ie rearing, striking, etc) then he will not get shoes. I have read plenty of articles where a navicular horse has done well or better with a correct barefoot trim, so its not like I'd be giving up on him. Just giving up on the traditional route of helping the navicular pain.
    Amidst a conversation about her past as an established equestrian, we drove by a wonderful barn filled with horses. I watched as she swiftly unrolled her window and took a deep breath through her nose, letting the sweet aroma fill her lungs. A true horsewoman, I thought. - Me

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    Thanks Trace for the reply! Seems like every navicular horse has its differences as far as what types of shoes work best as well as what drug works best for them. I have read that one horse does better on bute, but the next horse does better on previcox. I wonder if the difference in types of shoeing and drugs is because the horse is having different types of pain and problems (ie Bone vs soft tissue?)
    Amidst a conversation about her past as an established equestrian, we drove by a wonderful barn filled with horses. I watched as she swiftly unrolled her window and took a deep breath through her nose, letting the sweet aroma fill her lungs. A true horsewoman, I thought. - Me

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    I have a navicular horse and have friends that have had a few over the years, and all of them do much better in properly applies shoes.

    mine is in backwards shoes right now.
    Standing at Stud -
    "The Ultimate Version" aka "Harley" ( Good Version x Zippos Tinky Poo) unshown due to injury, but full brother to the famous mare "A Good Poo", earner of over $40,000 in Western Pleasure and #24 on the LIFETIME leading NSBA horse's list

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    I'm not giving up right now, but if hes going to continue to be bad (ie rearing, striking, etc) then he will not get shoes
    . That is why we have vets with sedation.
    I have read plenty of articles where a navicular horse has done well or better with a correct barefoot trim, so its not like I'd be giving up on him.
    many barefoot trims are not correct, despite the trimmers claims. I follow behind LOTS of barefoot trimmers who totally missed the mark when it comes to hoof form and balance. (and to be fair,a lot of farriers too)
    You need to be sure you have someone who actually knows how to balance a foot and remove distortion in one or two trims. Most do not , they tinker with the foot a little teeny bit at as time for months to get something done that could be done in one trim.
    Lopinslow and tlwidener like this.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS,CE
    Retired Certified lameness specialist with the Equine Lameness Prevention Organization, former staff farrier for University of California Davis Veterinary teaching Hospital, Retired farrier science instructor.

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    As far as the shoeing goes, he had just been trimmed 1 week prior to his diagnosis. We did put corrective shoes on with a gel pad (natural balance shoes plus horse trax pad), and so far they haven't helped, BUT he was also just trimmed, so there wasn't much manipulation that could be done with his feet, all we really could do was throw the shoes on.
    Did you get Xrays after the shoeing to check to see if the foot is balanced and aligned correctly INTERNALLY? If the shoes and pads alone did not help at all then something is still not right in the shoeing, it could indeed be the trim. It could be many other factors that need to be different. NB shoes are just one of many tools. There is a LOT to successful lameness shoeing.

    Often these horses need even more breakover than the NB shoes have. Something like a PLR shoe or a Morrison roller, and maybe a wedge pad instead of a flat pad, or frog support that is limited to only the back 1" of frog if the frog hoof tests really sore in the middle. Or the NB shoe ground off more on the outside toe corner to allow eased breakover in that direction. Or Stewart Clogs instead of metal shoes. Or a full EDSS system for one or two shoeing,with the rails adjusted every couple weeks as the shoeing period goes along.
    And the heels of the foot must be trimmed correctly before a shoe is applied as many of these horses have also suffered from under run heels or bent bars for a long time.

    Also as to the horse being so bad to shoe that is likely because his feet hurt and he is being protective. If he got trimmed a week before the shoeing he may have been trimmed too short to shoe without discomfort nailing. Don't be afraid to have him sedated as needed until this resolves. Straight dormosedan given by the vet is the best I have found for shoeing fearful horses. No 'cocktails' and absolutely no acepromazine, ever.
    tlwidener likes this.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS,CE
    Retired Certified lameness specialist with the Equine Lameness Prevention Organization, former staff farrier for University of California Davis Veterinary teaching Hospital, Retired farrier science instructor.

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    Also if you are brave enough to post pics of his feet, and/or lateral view X-rays, I can maybe tell you a lot about his hoof form and balance.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS,CE
    Retired Certified lameness specialist with the Equine Lameness Prevention Organization, former staff farrier for University of California Davis Veterinary teaching Hospital, Retired farrier science instructor.

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    Straight dormosedan given by the vet
    Huntseat & Patty Siller are no doubt familiar with this phenomenon - but I happen to own a horse who can't be given dormosedan at all (extreme ataxia = fell down, twice). Just a note of caution. We had no way of knowing this would happen beforehand of course, or it wouldn't have been administered!

    Good luck with your gelding Huntseat.

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    Thanks all for the replies, I am really not looking for any advice on how to treat my horses navicular. That is up to Me, my vet, and my farrier all working together to come up with a plan for him that is SAFE and works. I do not agree that giving my horse sedation just to shoe him is the best for me and my horse. Sorry but no matter what any of you say its not going to change my opinion on it.

    I am aware of the shoeing options, like I said I am a vet tech and have had special training in all aspects of animal medicine. That being said, I am also smart enough and have the ability to freshen up on my navicular knowledge, read the books I have from tech school, etc. I am well aware of what options there are for my guy. I am also well aware of what types of shoes and pads I'm not a fan of. I know what I want to try first, and I know what I want to try as last resort.

    All I am looking for here in this thread is if anyone has tried previcox with their navicular horses and if it seemed to help? SO, lets get back to that topic.
    Amidst a conversation about her past as an established equestrian, we drove by a wonderful barn filled with horses. I watched as she swiftly unrolled her window and took a deep breath through her nose, letting the sweet aroma fill her lungs. A true horsewoman, I thought. - Me

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    WOW. your question on previcox has been answered. CLEARLY you do want to learn anything else from those of us who DO deal with it AND from Patty who is very well versed in this sort of thing... since you apparantly seem to think you know everything already
    Standing at Stud -
    "The Ultimate Version" aka "Harley" ( Good Version x Zippos Tinky Poo) unshown due to injury, but full brother to the famous mare "A Good Poo", earner of over $40,000 in Western Pleasure and #24 on the LIFETIME leading NSBA horse's list

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