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I really am fed up with my dog! I will let him out and he ...
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    Senior Member+ DiamondRio's Avatar
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    My Dog Won't Stop Pooping in the House!

    I really am fed up with my dog!

    I will let him out and he will go pee pee then scratch at the door so I will let him in and he will wander around (while im watching tv and not paying attention) and then poop somewhere else in the house!

    When he goes to wander sometimes I will hear him and send him outside and he will just do the same thing. Either stand by the door and just stare inside or pee and then turn around and want back in.

    I am at a loss of what to do! He is the only dog that I have not been able to potty train!
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure..life is either a daring adventure or nothing." ~Hellen Keller
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    Senior Member katyrides's Avatar
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    My dogs have been acting the same way! Odd.
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    What are you feeding him and how old is he? After I know that I can help you some more

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    Senior Member+ classygirl23's Avatar
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    Well I can tell you one thing hehe...my dog wont go outside without someone out with her lol...she is very odd....she will sit by the door or only be out for 2 seconds if you are not out with her! its a comfort thing for her I guess she just loves to always be around you so if you stand outside with her she will do her business in no time! Strange huh..i cater to my dog so she goes potty lol...I know thats probably nothing to do with your situation but maybe something to keep in mind?
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    Senior Member+ DiamondRio's Avatar
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    He never use to do that but i noticed he started this summer.

    I actually think he is being spiteful because he HATES the cat and when I play with the cat he gets super mad.

    JUST as i was typing this he pooped in the house again!
    We just got home, i let him out of his kennel and put him outside. He was out for at least 10 minutes. I saw him pee and he scratched to come in so i let him in. I just walked into the living room and there was POOP on the front rug. AHHH he is so bad!
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure..life is either a daring adventure or nothing." ~Hellen Keller
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    Senior Member+ DiamondRio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontegoBay View Post
    What are you feeding him and how old is he? After I know that I can help you some more

    He is around 7 and has to have special science diet food cause he has pancreitus or whatever haha.
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure..life is either a daring adventure or nothing." ~Hellen Keller
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    beautify all things in your life.




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    Senior Member texasreb's Avatar
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    Take your dog to the vet to rule out any underlying medical issues. Once you get the “all clear” then you can begin (re)-training for positive behavior.
    I would also go outside with the dog and stay with it until it has finished eliminating. Don’t “put the dog out” and then let it back in when it scratches on the door. You are not controlling the situation, the dog is.

    Below are two articles that I got from dog behaviorist Lee Mannix. Copy and print them and follow them. Dog training isn't magic but if you follow the messages in these articles with commitment they will help you and all of your pets. Again, the key here is YOUR willingness to commit to training the dog.



    ”Too Bad” A Consequence


    The goal of this article is to give you a positive way of correcting your dog for a negative behavior. The reason why words like NO and OFF do not work is because we haven’t established rules or meaning behind these words. Usually such commands are backed up with lots of useless negative emotion. A simple reward system for a dog is when you look, touch, or talk to the dog, be it negative or positive. A good example of this reward system is when a dog jumps up. What we see most people do when the dog jumps up is to push down on the dog while looking at him and yelling, NO or OFF. The dog then hits the deck only to reload and jump right back up again. This becomes the cycle. The question is asked, “Why does my dog keep jumping on me?” and the answer, “Because you keep rewarding the behavior.”

    With the reward system in mind, let’s now look at a positive correction. You will need some supplies. First, you will need a snap buckle similar to what is on the end of your leash. Second, you will need some thin rope or clothesline. Attach a ten-foot section of the rope or line to the snap buckle and hook it to your dog’s collar. We will now refer to this as a long line. Try NOT to use your regular leash that you use when walking the dog. THAT leash must hold a positive value for later training. Any time you are with your dog in the house, he must wear the long line. Do not leave it on your dog when you are not in the house and do not use it outside.

    The long line allows us to correct the dog without using the simple reward system. When the dog displays a negative behavior (jumping, stealing, chewing, barking, inappropriate eliminating, trash digging, getting on furniture, etc.) approach your dog and pick up the long line. Immediately turn your back on the dog and walk toward a crate or designated room with while keeping your back to the dog. As soon as you feel tension in the long line, say in a very sweet tone, “Too Bad” and place the dog in the area you have chosen for timeouts. Note: Do not turn to look at your dog and/or coax him to come with you. The dog is to remain in the timeout for twenty minutes (for every infraction) the first week and two minutes thereafter. It’s important the timeout clock does not start until the dog is settled and quiet. If the dog barks, whines, cries, scratches at the door, etc. the clock is reset. When the timeout has expired, let the dog out, and ignore him for two minutes. When an undesirable behavior is repeated; repeat the “Too Bad” process even if it occurs within the first two minutes of being released from his previous timeout.

    It is very important that you do not display any emotion before, during, or after the correction. This only confuses the learning process. Remember we are training a command and we don’t want it to intimidate the dog. The command should mean removal of reward and separation from the pack. As long as we never use negative emotion then it will not make the timeout area a negative area and therefore not a punishment. It is also important that we are consistent in our corrections as this is the only way rules are established.


    Control in Your Pack


    Dogs are pack animals that live by specific rules, some instinctual and many learned. Humans live under an entirely different set of rules. The differences in our methods of communication set the stage for some of the problems humans have with their dogs. People tend to treat dogs like people and dogs treat people like dogs. It is the miscommunication between the two that lead to the “obedience” problems we as owners have with our dogs.

    There is a strict hierarchy that governs pack life and it is extremely important that we as humans understand and incorporate this in our relationships with dogs. Dogs, much like people, have different personalities and play different roles in their pack. There are dogs that are driven to lead and others are content to follow. Those with a high drive tend to have more negative behavior issues, while those with a low drive are more likely to be easy-going and complacent. The leader of the pack always controls four key areas: Feeding, sleeping area, playing games, and grooming. Since your dog sees you as another dog, if you can control these four areas, you can establish yourself as the leader of your pack. Your dog is more likely to respond to your commands if he respects you. If you can control the four areas of the pack, you can control your dog.

    Feeding
    In the canine world, high-ranking dogs control the time and place of feeding and ALWAYS eat first. Not following the order in which pack members eat is how the majority of owners lose most of their control to their dogs. To establish yourself as the leader you must always eat before your dog does. Prepare your dog’s food and leave it on the counter until you have finished eating your meal. Let him watch you prepare his food and watch you eat before you give him his dinner. Do not have set times at which you feed your dog and never “free feed”; where you leave your dog’s food bowl down all day for him to access at his own leisure. There should be no free food. Use the mealtimes an opportunity for basic training by making your dog work for his meals (NILIF—Nothing in Life is Free). Do this by asking your dog to sit and to hold the sit before getting his food. You can also feed your dog from a Kong or an empty soft drink bottle. If you are eating out, eat a cracker or pretend to eat from your dog’s bowl in front of him before giving him his food.

    Please note that dogs do not beg, they demand. While higher-ranking dogs always eat first, you may also see one dog attempt to stare down another in an effort to move in on the food. A higher-ranking dog can elicit food by sitting in a lower-ranking dog’s critical space and staring at the lower-ranking dog until he leaves the food. Usually this occurs with a high-ranking dog moving a lower-ranking dog or in a bold attempt by a lower-ranking dog to challenge a higher-ranking one. At home with your dog, you may experience this in the kitchen or eating area. You are eating your sandwich and reading the paper when you look over to see your dog sitting nicely and staring intently at you. You think he is so cute, sitting there patiently and quietly. You can’t resist that adorable face any longer and you share a piece of your sandwich with your dog. He has just stared you down for your food and established himself higher in the pack than you! It is important never to feed your dog directly from you hand, unless you are training a behavior.

    Sleeping
    High-ranking dogs control sleeping and resting areas. The leader of the pack always controls when and where lower-ranking dogs sleep. The leader does this by controlling movement and space. You should establish a “bumping technique” in which you NEVER step around or over your dog. You want to always move through the dog and control pathways. For example, if your dog is lying or standing between you and a ringing telephone, when you get up to answer it, don’t walk around him. Instead walk straight to him, nudge him with your foot and make him move, and continue on in a straight line. Do this without making eye contact with your dog, as it could possibly turn the communication into play or a challenge. Use this bumping technique throughout the day, making it a part of the daily routine.

    In continuation of this, you should make a point of putting your dog to bed (i.e., in his crate on the floor) every night. When you are getting ready for bed, take your dog to his designated sleeping area and tell him to go to sleep. To further your control, any time your dog is already in his sleeping area (even a napping area), go over to him and make him move. Again, nudge him with your foot until he gets up to leave and then stand in his spot for two minutes. Don’t ever look at him or speak to him when using the bumping technique.

    As a side note, we recommend that you NEVER allow your dog to sleep in your bed or on any of your furniture with you as this can lead to displays of aggression, separation anxiety, and over-bonding with you. This is a good way to set boundaries for your dog so that he better understands his role in the pack.

    Games
    High-ranking dogs always control play. They begin and end all games and play, as should you. To do this, never allow your dog to bring a toy to you and demand play. If your dog keeps nagging you to play, it is important that you ignore his demands until he gives up. Once your dog disassociates, wait two minutes; produce a different toy than the one he had, and YOU initiate play. Don’t leave any of your dog’s toys around for him to access “at will”, you control when, where and how he plays. You should get the toys out when it’s time to play.

    Grooming
    High-ranking dogs also assert their control by individually grooming each member of the pack several times a day. We refer to this as a “vet check” and it proves to be a valuable training tool in that it reinforces your leadership. At your initiation, be sure to hold, stroke, and massage your dog daily. When you are finished with each grooming session, push your dog sway and do not allow him to pester you for more petting or to groom you in return, which he may do by trying to lick you or rub against you.

    Most dogs will follow if given a strong leader. If you can work on taking control of these four key areas understood and practiced by wild and domestic canines, you will have a dog that follows and is a pleasant companion. Also, by understanding these areas you will have the tools to see why a bad behavior is happening. It is much easier to integrate dogs into our world if we attempt to better understand theirs.

    Strength without gentleness is meanness; gentleness without strength is weakness.

  8. #8
    Dax
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    Take your dog for a walk - don't just throw them out to do their business. Most dogs like humans, will have a need to go after some physical activity. When he/she looks like they are about to poop - say "do your business" and then praise when the deed is done. Continue to do this all the time and eventually you will only need to say "Do your business (or words to the affect)" to get them to eliminate on command.

    Most importantly is not to assume the dog knows why he is outside. He's a dog!
    Please don't litter - spay/neuter your pets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dax View Post
    Take your dog for a walk - don't just throw them out to do their business. Most dogs like humans, will have a need to go after some physical activity. When he/she looks like they are about to poop - say "do your business" and then praise when the deed is done. Continue to do this all the time and eventually you will only need to say "Do your business (or words to the affect)" to get them to eliminate on command.

    Most importantly is not to assume the dog knows why he is outside. He's a dog!
    When i first got him we did this and i would say "go potty" and eventually, as you said, i just had to say "go potty" and he would. For some reason he has just started this buisness of not going on his own...

    I will try going out with him today and see if it helps.

    I should probebly add that he is a papillon.
    He also has been checked by the vet on this and besides his pancreas problems he has a clean bill.
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure..life is either a daring adventure or nothing." ~Hellen Keller
    Love your life, perfect your life,
    beautify all things in your life.




  10. #10
    Senior Member+ DiamondRio's Avatar
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    Well, i have been going out with my dog and he still will go pee then just stand at the door even if i walk away, he just sits down.
    Then goes inside and poops in the house! AHH
    "Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure..life is either a daring adventure or nothing." ~Hellen Keller
    Love your life, perfect your life,
    beautify all things in your life.




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