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Discuss Laminitic Diet?? at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.

What is a good diet for a laminitic horse? I know that they need high ...
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    Laminitic Diet??

    What is a good diet for a laminitic horse? I know that they need high fibre and low starch. Are oats/alfalfa harmful for a laminitic horse?
    I believe that either you control your attitude, or it controls you.


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    Not all lamintic horses need to be treated alike with it comes to diet. Have you determined the cause of the laminitis? If it is dietary related, then yes, you need to reduce carbs (sugars/starches) to around 20% or less of the total dietary intake.

    Alfalfa can be ok to feed some laminitic horses, but only if you are sure that they will not have a negative response to it...that is if they have been eating it before with no adverse effects (like they got hot on it or have an allergy to it). ALL grains are high in carbs than any other feedstuff that we give horses. They produce the highest glycemic responses and thus are not indicated for hoses that are carb intolerant or have insulinresistance....this includes many Cushings and thyroid cases.

    A good diet for a horse with metabolic disorders of the types that I have mentioned is to feed a mid to low quality hay (perferably at least six months old). This should not be timothy or orchardgrass or straight alfalfa. Mixed native grasses are perfered. Hay should consist of at least 80% of the diet (by weight).

    In addition to hay, beet pulp (preferably without molasses...or soaked and drained), alfalfa hay, pellets or cubes, flax and rice bran are acceptable feedstuff with the addition of a quality vit/min mix. Ideally, the hay should be tested and a custom mineral mix made that complements the hay.

    There are a couple of commercial feeds that Triple Crown and Pennfield produce that are acceptable as they are beet pulp based, contain no grains and are below the 20% carb level. However, these should be fed in very small amounts and therefore are generally not beneficial. The other things I listed are more beneficial because they can be fed in higher amounts so that nurtients from them add to the meal.

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    Nothing is a good diet for some laminitics (especially ponies) lol.
    Seriously if the horse is keeping weight on then just free-feed hay as described very adeptly by SueB.
    For horses that need extra feed we use some stuff called Happy-hoof which is designed to promote correct hoof growth and provide low-starch energy without resorting to grains. If you dont have that over there i'd be a bit stumped as to what to use!

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    Nutrena also just came out with a grain that they are pointing laminitic horses towards, Safe Choice. This info is actually for a friend of mine, who's horse foundered awhile back. She was asking me about diet info, thought I would ask you guys.
    So, wehn you say 20% carb level, would this be listed on the bag?? And does that include carb's from hay??
    Also, does tying up and laminits have anything to do with each other?? Right before he foundered, he was tying up, she changed his diet and he hasnt tyed up since, but shortly after, he foundered....
    He is a halter horse, not overweight, just fit, but he is a massive horse. He is upright in his paterns and his right front grows different than the left. (foundered in right front only) He grows a lot more toe on the right than the left.

    HAppy Hoof ..I will look this up. Thanks Lou....
    I believe that either you control your attitude, or it controls you.


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    Lou3- We Happy Hoof ! Seminole / Spillers sells it...

    New Product Review

    Happy Hoof
    The only complete feed in North America for horses and ponies at high risk for laminitis

    Ocala, FL -- Spillers/Seminole Feed, leaders in equine nutrition, proudly introduce into the North American market Happy Hoof - the first complete feed formulated especially for laminitic horses.
    With its unique dehydrated, chopped timothy and oat hay, which is mixed with a vitamin/supplement-enriched pellet and an alfalfa pellet, Happy Hoof offers the best-known diet for horses and ponies at high risk for laminitis. With Happy Hoof's high-fiber, low-starch mix, which is high in vitamins and minerals, many veterinarians recommend the feed as a complete diet for laminitic horses. The highly palatable product contains spearmint, garlic, and soy oil and is lightly coated in molasses. Despite all its nutritional benefits, Happy Hoof is low in calories, allowing horse owners to feed the product without worrying about adding weight to horses that usually suffer from obesity.
    The feed also contains added biotin, zinc and methionine to help maintain healthy hooves, mannanoligosaccharides that block pathogenic bacteria, yucca that has anti-inflammatory properties and also binds ammonia, and glucomannan, a yeast cell wall derivative that is effective against aflatoxin in a horse's environment.
    Spillers/Seminole's Happy Hoof is excellent for convalescing horses or horses on stall rest, thanks to its balanced formula that provides the micro nutrients to support recovery. Trials show that chopped forage takes longer to eat than hay, so Happy Hoof keeps hungry horses content for longer.
    If your horse or pony is at high risk for, or suffering from, laminitis, or if you have other nutrition questions, please call 1-800-683-1881. Happy Hoof can be purchased at Seminole dealers throughout Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina. Visit www.seminolefeed.com to find a dealer near you.






    SueB--this has Timothy hay as an ingredient--is it still a good product?
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    YIPEEEE. I have never heard of this before. you guys are great!!


    Do you feed this as grain replacer then?? And would you feed this in conjunction with hay? She doesnt have a weight problem with him though. Is this only used for overweight hroses??
    I believe that either you control your attitude, or it controls you.


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    yep we feed it as a grain replacer and all of the laminitics we have had have done pretty well on it, sometimes with a bit of beet pulp added for extra in the cold of the winter or if the horse is in very hard work.
    Hay fed as normal.

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    Very cool, I am going to give their # to her so she can call their nutritionist. Thank you
    I believe that either you control your attitude, or it controls you.


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    also the nutrients are very well balanced so if she feeds this according to what goes on the bag then she can add oil to his feed to bulk up the calories. Fat is much safer than carbs as an energy source for laminitics.

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    On the back of the bag it gives lbs to feed as a replacement for hay or as a total diet--It goes by weight of the horse...for 1100 lbs (and it states it might need to be adjusted up or down) it says that if you feed either the recommended amount for supplemented hay or pasture, which I believe was 6 or 7 pounds + the remainder in pasture or hay or only the Happy Hoof as the sole roughage (I cant remember exactly but it was about 12-14 pounds but dont quote me!)then you will get the indicated amounts of the various vitamins/minerals, protiens, etc. that is listed.... The specify you split the indicated amount in 3 seperate feedings. It is indicated for easy keepers, horses in danger of laminitis, have it, or on stall rest-- It seems that it is fed without grain, as it look just like chaff (chopped hay) with a small amount of pelleted food also. I can go out to the barn and get the bag if you want me to read any specific info from it...just PM me!
    Madness takes its toll.
    Please have exact change.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
    -Frost
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