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Discuss How much does a horse trainer make? at the Horse Training forum - Horse Forums.

If someone (me) wants to become a horse trainer how much could I expect to ...
  1. #1
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    How much does a horse trainer make?

    If someone (me) wants to become a horse trainer how much could I expect to make?
    I know a lot of factors come into this, how good you are? How many years experience you have?
    Do you think someone who is going to school right now on a Radio TV major who is 21 has any chance of becoming a professional horse trainer teaching natural horsemanship and can make a decent living doing it?

    I don't own my own horse to work out on and no I really don't know anyone that can help me to fulfill this passion. There really isn't a direct route into the horse industry is there? It's who you know.
    Are ther any good schools in or near Pennsylania that trains people strictly horse training and/ or Natural horsemanship?

    Jonathon

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    Well...it really depends on how good you are...the better you are, the more you can charge.

    Like Debbie McDonald...she charges $250 a lesson I think, or something like that (or maybe it was for a clinic session).

    Here's a trainer that you can look at...I think this is what the average trainer makes. This particular trainer, I know for a fact, is excellent.

    www.juliesodowskydressage.com.

    Look around on that website (esp. under training) and you can do the math .
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    I know a local trainer that fits and shows halter horses. He makes $1,000 per month and has a house, utilities and a truck provided.
    He does not ride.
    The truth may kill you but at least you will not die with a lie in your mouth.

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    I did some math...probably not accurate but oh well lol.

    My trainer and her husband, together (both are trainers) make about $3500 a month I would think (probably more). The $3500 a month does not include clinics and judging, and I am very sure they have more students than what I calculated. But, with horses, most of that money doesn't exactly get to be spent on luxury lol. But, either way, I still want to be a trainer . I'd die happy.

    One has worked 10 years and the other....oh I dunno....more lol.

    Then, I know trainer who is starting out and has been riding since she was 5. She is now 22 I think, and I'm guessing she makes around $1200 a month.
    "We will restore chaos to the country! And we will!" -Ignoramus George Bush
    This is a sad time in America--a country that I have loved and cherished so much . Please take care of Her and vote without ignorance.
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    Do you mean a trainer (as in trains the horses) or a riding instructor (who trains the rider) or a combination of the two?
    Since you mentioned natural horsemanship do you mean starting youngsters or re training "problem" horses?
    It is not a matter of who you know or a matter of what you know, it is a matter of ability in handling horses,people and fulfilling the clients objective in the time and cost frame that you have quoted. The sky is the limit as far as income. If I did not net a minimum of $6000 per week (you apply this to your own capabilities and future prospects) after 5 years I would quite.

    I think the estimate above must be way off. Can make more than that driving a truck. lol

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    i think it all depends on what you want to focus on an what qualifications you have or will have

    also word of mouth is always a good thing so when you start out you need to relay on yourself being good so clients will recommend you to others

    it also depends what other trainers are about in you area an how well they are known
    bluebell , haribo , william & lil bill
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    Trust me when workin up to it you dont make AS much but if you work for one farm you almost always get your board (all house bills and food bills) paid for and then also get your pay. Normally board for one horse to. You really have to enjoy doing it, esp in the beginning....it's hard work and invoves constantly learning....



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    IF you can make a name for yourself, and get clients, which they want someone with PROOF they can produce quality, you can make a decent living. But it is hard work.

    I take on one or two horses here and there. But because I don't have a "NAME" for myself, (though it is growing), I don't get consistancy. So I cannot count on my "training" income. I charge $300 with me providing the feed/hay per month. Doesn't pay much except my own horses food plus theirs. But I get a nice start on them before they move up to the $500 a month trainers, who 2 are now going to be throwing work at me next year. They don't want to "BREAK" Horses anymore. So we are working out a contract for me to break, and them to finish. Saves their clients money in the long run, and them the back aching process of settling them.


    For me to CONTINUE to be successful, I need to hit the show ring with some. Those are the "TRAINERS" that make a living. People want someone who's produced X amount of reiners, X amount of cutters, X amount of WP placing horses, etc. Not some backyard pup like what I usually deal with. I'm lucky enough to be good friends with both these trainers to even GET this chance at taking on their "babies". And it is still up to the owner if they want to send their horses to me. So I still have to sell myself to them, though the guys have been doing a wonderful job saying they'd prefer their babies go through me before they come to them for finishing.

    Basically I'd get the horse for 30-60 days, then they take them on for 30-60 days, depending on what exactly they want on the horse, and the learning curve of the horse themselves.

    To be a "trainer" by profession, it is best to apprentice under another trainer. They basically teach you EVERYTHING they know. That is kind of what I"m doing, but I'm not getting the "finishing" skills that they do. I already have the breaking skills. Though I can go out there and learn what I want anytime I want to. Just haven't had the time in the past...

    Ok, I'm rambling.
    Nothing like seeing nature from the back of a horse!

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    To follow up on what Bistering Winds has said.

    The bigger money is in a person that 'shows'. They can put points on a horse. Proof in the pudding so to speak.
    That takes years to bring together. Plus YOU have to be a good rider and trainer. Some never get there. They simply do not have the physical skills or the "feel" needed to get a horse trained and shown. The competition is stiff there.
    At one time I was campaigning some horses of my own. One thing I learned is that you have to get your horses show to the judge. Not just enter the arena, but get them shown.
    Once you begin to win, the show results are published it that breeds magazine. Once that begins to happen, you are over the hump. From that point, you have basically made the statement that you are one to be contended with, not just one hoping to pin.
    It is nice to see your name in print
    Judges also look at the show results and it does smooth the road to success some.
    The truth may kill you but at least you will not die with a lie in your mouth.

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    Thank you for all of your responses...

    I guess you have to have a desire and love to get into starting your own business as a horse trainer. I am not even sure it's worth the aggravation, time and money to find a reputable trainer who is willing to teach you what he knows, and to buy horse equipment for your profession and try and make a name for yourself. I am not saying that I prefer the easy way out of making a decent living and I understand what it takes to earn a profit from a hard days work. But for someone who is in the dark and has no family who is into horses, I would have a frustrating and time consuming road ahead of me and it might make me think twice about whether it's worth it to try. It's hard work and there no guarantee that it will work for you. The only sure thing you can be is to complete as many levels of school as possible for you interest aside from horses and hope you will get a good job.
    It's a crying shame that this business is all about who you know and how much green you have rather then pure goodness of heart and rewards for helping someone in so much of a need and desire that the message gets so scrambled and lost.

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