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Discuss Horse That Breaks Away on Lunge Line: HELP! at the Horse Training forum - Horse Forums.

Have you tried running the lunge line through the bit and back to the lunge ...
  1. #51
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    Have you tried running the lunge line through the bit and back to the lunge surcingle (on the inside) so that if the horse goes to pull/run against the bit it pulls the horse's head to it's side? This would prevent the horse from bracing in order to break away.
    Like this (ignore the side rein, though using a longer side rein on the outside might be needed if horse just wants to turn tothe inside)
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisethebar View Post
    Then lunge her on a circle with an outside rein. Basically, ground drive her on a circle. If she bolts, you have both reins to stop her just like if you were in the saddle. This way s/he can't use his/her body as leverage against you. If you're lunging left and she bolts and runs right, just use your right rein. Stop her and put her right back on the circle - same direction you were going.
    Actually, thats a good idea
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  3. #53
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    [QUOTE=MysticRealm;7114601]Have you tried running the lunge line through the bit and back to the lunge surcingle (on the inside) so that if the horse goes to pull/run against the bit it pulls the horse's head to it's side? This would prevent the horse from bracing in order to break away.
    Like this (ignore the side rein, though using a longer side rein on the outside might be needed if horse just wants to turn tothe inside)
    TE]

    That would probably result in a disaster, considering she freaks out when she steps on the lead. She hasn't figured out that pressure release part. I wouldn't mind doing that in the future though
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  4. #54
    Full Member TurnNBurn321's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=AlexNelms;7114543]I would still try a Cavesson. This is EXACTLY what my mare used to do to me. Threw a cavesson on, and she figured out I had the upper hand.

    (Horse is not mine. Picture does not belong to me. Found on Google Images.)

    E]

    I realize there is many different devices to use, but I want to try and stay away from those. Since I probably won't use it ever again, and it might not even solve the problem. So I am not sure I should go that way just yet.
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  5. #55
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    Stepping on the lead, and having the head pulled to the side generally result in 2 different reactions. As long as you can flex her to the side by pulling on the rein, it really shouldn't be any different than the set up I described. It just doesn't allow the horse to brace which is what over powers the handler.
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  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by MysticRealm View Post
    Stepping on the lead, and having the head pulled to the side generally result in 2 different reactions. As long as you can flex her to the side by pulling on the rein, it really shouldn't be any different than the set up I described. It just doesn't allow the horse to brace which is what over powers the handler.
    Yes, and I understand that is generally the reaction. But Yacht is different, she reacts the same for both examples. When I ask her to flex, she does. But when she does it on her own, she freaks out.
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  7. #57
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    You would be the one flexing her to the side... you're the one holding the line. And if you do need to stop it cause she's ******** out all you do is let go of the line, she's used to running off while lunging anyways so it would be no different.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnNBurn321 View Post
    That doesn't work. When she bolts she turns and runs. She turns so quickly that by the time I start going with her, I am so far behind I end up yanking all my weight away from her, so she pulls even more.
    Then you aren't using it correctly.....it is relatively easy to stop even a big horse with a chain on the nose or a lip chain IF you know how to use it....doesn't have to cause huge discomfort for them (some is fine....there IS a consequence for turning and bolting and it should be strong enough that the horse elects not to do it again).

    This horse has your number and if you are truly lunging her at only a walk you should have ample time to correct her......they don't just spin and bolt...they give notice that they are thinking about it...if you are not reading that then yes, you will be behind the action and have a more difficult time getting a correction done but not because the horse is that quick but because you aren't getting the cues she's giving that she is going to do this. You probably need someone to show you how to do this. So far you've gotten a number of suggestions all of which can and do work on this kind of problem if used correctly....and so far you have poopoo'd almost every single one. Unfortunately she's learning that she can ignore you and things will progress downhill as this continues. One or two good corrections will usually solve this issue but I doubt you are going to be able or are not willing to do what needs doing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnNBurn321 View Post
    I have 3 different trainers, two out of the 3 who make me lunge. Yes, they have attempted lunging the horse, which resulted in the broken finger. So I think after that, they gave up. So now I'm left with figuring this out on my own. I tried asking for help, I didn't get the help I needed.
    Sorry if this has already been clarified, I gave up reading after 5 pages xD

    So, first of all... Three different trainers at once. I'm just wondering, how well does that work out (unrelated to the lunging issue, just in general)? I'm honestly curious because while I totally understand that getting info from several sources gives you more options and knowledge, I'm worried that you would be pulled in different directions and wind up lost. Do they coordinate with each other at all? Have you considered working with one trainer primarily and just going to the others for advice if needed?

    Back to lunging. I am quite frankly appalled that a "trainer" would lunge a horse and wind up injured, then continue to make their STUDENT work with the horse in the exact way that got themselves hurt. Appalled. If THEY can't manage it, then they should NOT be expecting you to either. If none of your trainers or the owner are willing to work with you on a serious and dangerous problem, then they have no right to force you to work on it at all.

    I don't know enough about the situation to judge, but based on what you've said I'd be taking a good hard look at your setup and wondering if it's time to find a new trainer that will help you and keep you safe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnNBurn321 View Post
    Yes, and I understand that is generally the reaction. But Yacht is different, she reacts the same for both examples. When I ask her to flex, she does. But when she does it on her own, she freaks out.
    This horse has problems way beyond just lunging. You really need a professional to step in here, that is not overhorsed by these problems. Sounds like all of your current trainers don't have the skills to deal with this horse. Find a trainer that is skilled enough to address it.

    If you continue on as you are now, there's a huge chance you or the horse (or both) are going to get hurt. A horse running like it's tail is on fire dragging a very long lunge line is a recipe for disaster.
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