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Discuss horse running over you when spooked on ground at the Horse Training forum - Horse Forums.

I have a 5year old gelding who was trained last year. but when I am ...
  1. #1
    Senior Member+ mamaalwaysrides's Avatar
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    horse running over you when spooked on ground

    I have a 5year old gelding who was trained last year. but when I am leading him on the ground, and he spooks he runs toward me, and a few weeks ago, I was leading him about 4 feet behind me like the trainer teaches and he spooked and hit my side and I hit the ground, my hip still hurts.

    anyway any input to how I can stop him from running toward me when spooked

    by the way I have went back to the traditional way of leading my horse so his head is at my shoulder. I don't trust him leading him behind me anymore

    thanks in advance

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    i have no problem with my horses walking politely WITH me, either.

    youth needs to touch when afraid or confused. instinctual. he gets scared and forgets his space. he's looking to you to save him. do your best to know what's around you when he's in hand, know the things that will unsettle him, be prepared. put him back where he belongs but not in a disciplinary way, just business-like. "this goes here", so to speak.

    spend some time sacking him out, and desensitising him to as much as you can. this will help minimizes the eruptions, tough him up a bit. teach him self-confidence with standing exercises, ground tying, working him increasingly away from you. be patient, clear and consistant.

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    Senior Member+ Simon Says's Avatar
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    I have that rule al horse should never walk behind you for that reason! My first gelding did that to me two times ina row and put me in the hospital! I walked him with a chain under his chin and we started from the basics (the chain was for me, I was scared to death of him for 2 months) Man him walk next to you and when he doesn't want to, stop make a small circle and start over, evetually they get it, some horses do walk slow, I just carry a dressage whip and tap on the butt and they move up!
    "If your dog doesn't like someone, you probably shouldn't either"

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    Some factors for you to consider.
    The horse natural instrinct of flight, tell us they're preservationist.
    1 of my mother's favor sayings & it fits the horse's way of thinking about this matter.
    Thats it is better to say...there he goes, then there he lay.
    The horse is only reacting, making this choice of self preservation.

    Right before they spooked, they have percieved some kind of danager, or concern.
    They're are overly excited, concern about whatever it is & no reassuring will matter & it doesn't matter if he is behind, or beside you.
    We can never, totally remove this instrinct, and I also think we shouldn't.
    This instrinct was put into the horse for a reason which has allow him to stay free of danger by moving his/her feet to a safe distance away from the threat.
    This is also a way for US HUMANS to be able, to also see the danger & move away with our horse, being preventive.
    A snake, or something scary & unknown come to mind.
    My horse gives me, the warning sign, that danger is present.
    I am entune with my horses, not just writing them off as they're only spooking to be spooking, no.
    But there are things you can do.
    Its about giving the horse another option, teaching him how to handle those scary moments, but there are other things, you must do first.
    Establish this before going into any desensitizing training.
    You must establish total control, gaining his respect and us humans understanding, the last thing we will ever get is their trust, that is the last submission from our horses.
    You must do this in a clear, consistent matter, leaving no stone unturn where the horse is able to select his leader, you.
    Once the horse has selected you as his leader.
    You must create a desensitization program.
    You must consider what the horse may encounter and try to get the horse familar to any objests, sounds, movement & that it is, no reason for him to head for the hills,
    but to relied on your request, leadership.
    I hope this helps.
    Last edited by Bruce Wiley; 07-15-2008 at 08:30 AM.

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    great post, Bruce : )

    they can hear, see, smell things that we can't, and their survival/security (in their minds) depends on their freedom and ability to react.

    i wholeheartedly agree with not diluting their instincts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mamaalwaysrides View Post
    I have a 5year old gelding who was trained last year. but when I am leading him on the ground, and he spooks he runs toward me, and a few weeks ago, I was leading him about 4 feet behind me like the trainer teaches and he spooked and hit my side and I hit the ground, my hip still hurts.

    anyway any input to how I can stop him from running toward me when spooked

    by the way I have went back to the traditional way of leading my horse so his head is at my shoulder. I don't trust him leading him behind me anymore

    thanks in advance
    your trainer tought you to lead the horse with it 4 feet behind you? ... thats a bit frightening.

    First off with this much distance you have no real control over the horse and have also created a very dangerous pocket for him. First off is running into you (as he has done). Second is him setting back, with him 4 feet behind, exactly how much lead rope do you have in hand? You should be keeping your hand on the lead rop below the halter, and keep the excess rope in your other hand (NOT wrapped around or tangled or dragging). With you nearer to your horse you will be able to sense him better, and be more attuned with how he is acting. You will be able to see the little signs before the big ones. But with him way behind you, you cant see him and you dont have control. In a horse so young, you should always be paying attention.
    When you sling mud you lose ground.

    This is the internet, anything you say will be misquoted and used against you. You have the right to not reply, but usually lack the ability. Your silence will be taken as an admission of guilt. Have a lovely stay!

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    A horse doesn't run over or bump into the boss horse. Ever. ETA: if they can help it.
    Horses will take an incredible amount of abuse from another horse or even challenge a fence to avoid running into the boss.
    Do you EVER at any time step back or move out of the way or because your horse will bump into you or to avoid having your horse step on you or because he's too close? The boss wouldn't.
    When you are leading your horse and you decide to change directions to ... let's say 4:30 (if straight ahead was 12:00 and straight back was 6:00) so, if you are going to go toward 4:30 do you just turn toward 4:30 and expect your horse to get out of your way (back up and hustle those shoulders over) or do you politely walk him in a circle or do you push on the leadrope and push his nose around to get him to step away from you? The boss horse simply walks in the direction it wants to go and every other horse needs to figure out how to get out of the way.
    What about when you are carrying a bucket of feed in each hand? Can you carry buckets of feed through the pasture and walk toward your horse and make him move out of your way without using your hands? If you've spent enough time teaching it that you can cue it with your body language you can.

    Horses don't run the boss over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Berlunz View Post
    your trainer tought you to lead the horse with it 4 feet behind you? ... thats a bit frightening.

    First off with this much distance you have no real control over the horse and have also created a very dangerous pocket for him. First off is running into you (as he has done). Second is him setting back, with him 4 feet behind, exactly how much lead rope do you have in hand? You should be keeping your hand on the lead rop below the halter, and keep the excess rope in your other hand (NOT wrapped around or tangled or dragging). With you nearer to your horse you will be able to sense him better, and be more attuned with how he is acting. You will be able to see the little signs before the big ones. But with him way behind you, you cant see him and you dont have control. In a horse so young, you should always be paying attention.
    I have to respectfully disagree with you on this topic. Not that I'm saying 4 feet behind is where I would have a horse lead, that's odd. Could there be a possibility the trainer meant 4 feet away? Not necessarily behind but away because the horse was used to leading very close -too close, and had too little respect to be that close? Or maybe the trainer did want them to lead it 4 feet behind, I could be wrong.

    It's entirely possible to have complete control over a horse from 4 feet away or even 30 feet away. I can have my horse walk, trot, canter, turn left, turn right, pivot, rollback, back, sidepass, and come to me from 30 feet away. I can even tell a horse which foot I want it to pick up from about 8 feet away - by the way you don't even need a halter or lead rope on them for any of this.

    Proximity really isn't the issue as much as training or lack of.

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    Horses don't run the boss over.[/quote]

    Agreed 100%!!!!!!!! If my horse ever did that he'd have heck to pay. And I wouldnt care what scared him. There is plenty of "spook" room w/out trampling me down.
    Having said that, I would not advise walking 4 feet in front of the horse while leading it....EVER. As you have learned thats not such a good place to be. I would spend alot of time with this horse in a halter and stud chain. If he gets into your space for ANY reason give him a correction. And make sure your walking beside him NOT in front of him. If the horse gets pushy stop and make him back up. You dont have to go crazy with the corrections, but make sure he knows when he's made a mistake. Good ground manners will carry over to everything else. Its one of my BIGGEST pet peeves. My horse will walk beside me respectfully without a halter and lead and just one hand touching him to guide him. I never allow him to push or pull on me. He is this way because I have spend many hours on ground manners with him.

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    Senior Member+ mamaalwaysrides's Avatar
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    I do have a very good trainer, Jake was a rescue and not really handled till he was two. he was a very hard colt to start. he definetly is not spooky when on top of him. and I know he senses my insecurity since I got knocked down by him, very powerful animals. I am working on not being worried about him knocking me down, so he doesn't sense what I am feeling. with him you can carry a lunging whip with a plastic bag hanging off of it ,and it doesnt' even phase him.

    like I said he is going to walk right next to me from now on, so I can see him, the other way just didn't work for me or him

    I want to thanks all of you for all your advice

    he has had respect issues with me in the past but now I do believe he sees me as the boss horse.

    he has just gotten spooky lately on the ground, for whatever reason I don't know, but hopefully I will not get knocked down again, and will work with everything all of you have given me

    thank you

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