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Discuss Help with hock injury! at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.

It's been three weeks since I saw my TB gelding slip and fall while running ...
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    Full Member vafoxchaser's Avatar
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    Help with hock injury!

    It's been three weeks since I saw my TB gelding slip and fall while running in the pasture. He popped right back up but was three legged. I brought him into the barn and although I was able to see which leg was injured I did not see any apparent wounds. Gave him 10cc banamine and hosed the leg. He was weight bearing within 15mins. so just kept him in the stall for the night. When I went out to feed in the morning there was major heat and swelling in the hock. . Again cold hosed and gave 2g bute and wrapped the hock with standing bandages also. My vet has been out and done digital x-rays and US and dx a small avulsion fracture. I'm looking at the report but it isn't very helpful in terms of location...sorry. He just assured me that it isn't in a spot that will cause problems and will heal with rest. Now what he has been unable to tell me is just how long to expect all this heat and swelling to last. Quinn is still on stall rest with 1g of bute 2x a day. DMSO and wrapping. Honestly I see little to no improvement and am getting a little discouraged. Quinn seems sound enough when walking to and from the wash rack. I don't know how painful he would be without the bute though. I tried to cut him down to 1g per day last week and the swelling increased and he resented me touching the hock during the bandage change. Vet said to keep up the 2g for another week. Quinn is 1300 lbs of fit OTTB and is getting somewhat resentful in his stall rest....oh my, the trips out of the stall are now including a nose chain. I would just like to hear from anyone who has had an injury like this, I need some encouragement! thanks

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    Senior Member+ royalrox's Avatar
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    I don't have suggestions about the injury. BUT being on Bute and on stall rest I would strongly recommend putting him on some sort of ulcer treatment at a preventative dose. You don't need to be dealing with ulcers as well.
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    My pony had an similar injury, but she got her's from rolling in her pen and smacking her hock on the bottom of the pipe corral. Swelled to the same size as her nose. Did the same thing as you, cold hose 20 minutes twice a day, hand walking, etc. Didn't work.

    Then, I found Arnafloura gel , and mixed it with the DMSO and put THAT on the hock (make sure to keep it out of any cuts though). It gets *Very* warm, but the mixture works like a charm (you don't wrap it though, just leave it to air). It redused the swelling in her hock to literally half over night. And within 2-4 days it was gone completely.

    Here's a link for the stuff:
    [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Boericke-Tafel-Arniflora-Arnica-2-75/dp/B000Z5OHOK"]Amazon.com: Boericke & Tafel - Arniflora Arnica Gel, 2.75 oz gel: Health & Personal Care[/ame]

    You'll want to find an good lotion/moisterisor to use AFTER your 1 week regimine of Arniflora and DMSO, but only after you are completely done and have completely 100% rinsed (at the end of the 1 week) with soap and water the area. Put lotion on the area, as the DMSO will dry the skin out and make it flaky. DMSO is the carrier for the Arnica Gel which is the agent. It Naturally Reduces Swelling, Stiffness and Inflammation while increasing blood flow to speed up healing.

    I personally would give atleast six weeks off completely, bones need TIME to heal. And you can repeat the Arnica Gel Week, for as many weeks as you want. But you need to do 3-4 days of lotion/moisterisor inbetween to protect the skin.

    My pony was back to work in just over 4 weeks, but she heals super fast from everything. Oh and as for encuragement. She started being trained to drive cart 4-5 weeks after the injury. And within about 3-6 months went into full training for show jumping. And her inbetween time was spent on the trails, which included LOTS of hills. And now 3-4yrs out, she's never shown any indication of lameness or anything.
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    Full Member vafoxchaser's Avatar
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    Thanks for the thoughts on the bute. I worry about it as I have had a horse in the past react badly to short term doses of the stuff. My vet assures me that Quinns current dose is okay for awhile. My other horse didn't show any gastro type problems.....he sadly developed renal failure after only two weeks on Bute for an eye infection. Had to put him down.

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    Full Member vafoxchaser's Avatar
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    Sunrisepony what is the proportion of the arnica to DMSO? I have already had to add a 50% dilution of water to the DMSO as it started to scurf him up. Thank you so much for all your help. this is a wonderful board.

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    The only "ok dose for a while" of bute, one unlikely to cause ulcers, is a few times a month or so.

    2gm/bute a day for even just a couple of days, let alone the 3 weeks now, can easily cause ulcers in some horses. I strongly second the suggestion to start some sort of ulcer treatment, even if it's just dosing him twice a day with ranitidine (ie generic Zantax), at 3mg/lb of body weight.

    Without knowing where the fracture was/is, it's hard to offer thoughts. It may be time to do another set of xrays, because some fractures won't show up immediately, and you may be dealing with more than the one.
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    I would not have given any pain relievers as the horse will then bear weight and cause more injury than if they were left in discomfort. Remember, horses don't know they should take care of an injury; ONLY pain tells them to take care of it. If they don't have pain, off they go and cause more injury to themselves. Pain is nature's way of telling the horse to take care of itself.



    [QUOTE=Outrider;7441522]In this day and age we have WAY too many people, WAY too sensitive about WAY too many things and taking something that only deserves a "ho hum" response as a slight against themselves personally. [/QUOTE]

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    Pain IS natural, but with it often comes swelling (as in this case) and too much swelling, too prolonged swelling, is not good either. There's a line between enough pain/discomfort to keep the animal from using the area too much, and enough therapeutics to keep rampant swelling at bay.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBandRio View Post
    Pain IS natural, but with it often comes swelling (as in this case) and too much swelling, too prolonged swelling, is not good either. There's a line between enough pain/discomfort to keep the animal from using the area too much, and enough therapeutics to keep rampant swelling at bay.
    Certainly, And people, right off, don't want the horse in pain and give a pain reliever. In this case banamine. So the horse felt fine and ran around on the hock. Had it gotten nothing it might have taken better care of itself and not NEEDED the bute. The hock may not have swelled to the extent it is now had the horse not run around on it right after the injury. THAT was my point JB.



    [QUOTE=Outrider;7441522]In this day and age we have WAY too many people, WAY too sensitive about WAY too many things and taking something that only deserves a "ho hum" response as a slight against themselves personally. [/QUOTE]

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    Full Member WildAtHeart's Avatar
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    A good friend of mine had a 2 year old stud colt who severed a tendon in his hind leg and had to be on stall rest for almost 3 months! They put him on Quietex, and it helped an unbelieveable amount. And this colt was super high energy and MAD about being on stall rest!

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