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Can someone explain to me exactly what "green broke" means? At what point does a ...
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    Full Member DraftXLuvr's Avatar
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    Green Broke?

    Can someone explain to me exactly what "green broke" means? At what point does a young horse stop getting called "green broke?" Thanks!

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    Senior Member+ countryacres's Avatar
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    I think this would be a good thread of you to read.

    Progress? (from green broke to good rideable horse)
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    Quote Originally Posted by DraftXLuvr
    Can someone explain to me exactly what "green broke" means? At what point does a young horse stop getting called "green broke?" Thanks!
    Depends on who is talking


    Some people would call the mare I'm getting green broke (had a saddle, but no rider)

    Some people say 30 days in saddle is green broke.

    To me, when I call a horse "GREEN BROKE", that means I've put time on the horse, saddled the horse cold, got on cold, and walk, trot, lope without being bucked. the horse has the turn, stop, go ideas down to the point that he or she shouldn't just BLOW UP for no reason.


    however, to ANYONE ELSE that I get a horse from....when someone tells me "green broke"...usually means...horse has had a saddle on it, will buck here and there, and usually does mean horse SHOULD buck during a lope.

    At least that is my physical experience with other people's ideas.


    When I buy a green broke horse. I don't even bother riding the horse. I buy the horse as "unbroke" idea for my own personal safety and those around me.

    Until I get the horse in the pen and see truely what he/she can do.


    The mare I just bought, didn't even saddle her up to show me how far she is in her training. I just bought her as I would any other unbroke horse.



    Now, when I've gone several weeks without any blow up, we are trail riding, horse is doing leg cues, cold saddling, trailering without blowing up


    can stop, go, change to a walk, trot, lope, stop without a fight and pretty much on cue, I move from green broke to....well going horse. (I'm at loss for what I've called them in the past)


    Then when the horse has gone several months without incident....is progressing in his training, and is ready to be "finished" by a professional at a job.....he's broke.

    FINISHED horse would be I would ask, What is he finished in? Reining, Working Cow horse, WP....a "FINISHED" horse I would expect to saddle up and enter the show ring right then and there.....


    For example....Blister is BROKE...however, he has yet to be "FINISHED" in one specific area....
    Nothing like seeing nature from the back of a horse!

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    Full Member DraftXLuvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by countryacres
    I think this would be a good thread of you to read.

    Progress? (from green broke to good rideable horse)
    Thanks, that was certainly an interesting read...but it didn't really answer my question. I am not that concerned with the time it takes to develop a horse from the green broke stage...I just really am wondering if there is a standard definition for "green broke." I've been reading these sale ads for horses that say "green broke" and I'm wondering what exactly that means, if there is an exact meaning. As I suspected, and BW confirmed...defining "green broke" depends on who you talk to.

    I feel that when I talk about my own 4 yr old that I should consider him green broke, but according to many other people he is beyond that. I can walk/trot/stop him and take him on the trails without any incident. But he's not really developed a proper canter yet because I just started working him at the canter and he's not quite balancing and collecting yet. He *will* canter without incident but I prefer not to do it until he has learned it properly. I haven't pushed him too hard yet, and I might find he bucks when he is pushed harder. So far he is just a calm easygoing horse. He has an exceptional temperament, probably a 1 or maybe a 2 on his spunkiest day. I'm going to have a professional trainer finish him for WP this Summer although I don't intend to show him, I want him to have all the proper basic skills.

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    There is no 'official' definition of green broke, but BW gave a fair definition. I have a coming 5 year old in the same boat as yours, canter/lope work is not 'done'. I also consider her greenish, but by the end of this year she'll be broke.
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    Full Member DraftXLuvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freedom32
    There is no 'official' definition of green broke, but BW gave a fair definition. I have a coming 5 year old in the same boat as yours, canter/lope work is not 'done'. I also consider her greenish, but by the end of this year she'll be broke.
    *Greenish*...I like that!

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    From the marketing angle it depends on whether you are buying or selling the horse.
    If you're buying, "green broke" would mean: don't expect too much,
    If you're selling, it means: "he can do all the things you claim he can."
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    My girlfriend and I try to define our sale horses as follows:

    Unstarted: Just what it says...had a saddle, maybe a bridle and some ground driving but has never had a human on its back.
    Green-Broke: Has had a rider aboard, knows the basics of walk, trot, canter and backup. Rides good for us but needs an experienced to professional rider. Horse is still riding in a snaffle or bosal. Never been on the trail.
    Well-Started: More than just basic training, is learning to neck rein, backs up, has the basics of leg yields, has been on the trail at least a couple of times, hasn't offered to throw us or run off in at least 30 rides, flexes at the poll and doesn't resist the bit. Horse is still in a snaffle or bosal, may be learning how to ride in a curb. Still we recommend this horse for an experienced to professional rider.
    Broke: Horse is learning his leads, neck reins well, backs easily, yields to leg, goes out on the trail pretty regularly. Generally should not cause any problems for an intermediate and up rider (depending on the horse, some are good for beginners). Have had someone else besides me or my girlfriend ride it and gotten their opinion. Horse could be in either a snaffle or a curb at this point. In general, we recommend these horses for Intermediate level and up.
    Well-Broke: Horse is all around good, knows his leads, neck reins, backs, yields to leg, goes out on the trail in groups or alone. Should be no problem for Beginners and up. Pretty much anybody can ride. Finished and riding in a snaffle.
    Finished: A horse that has all of the above but has had further training making it show ready for any discipline (i.e. reining, cutting, etc.)
    Kid-Safe: Generally a horse that is Well-Broke, but may or may not be dull to the aids, will take direction from a child (and we verify this...some horses ignore them). A horse we are CONFIDENT will NOT blow up, bolt, buck, rear, or spin. A horse we are CONFIDENT will spook in place. A horse we are CONFIDENT will not easily panic. In our opinion horse is in NO danger of placing anybody in harms way.

    All in all, we can push a borderline horse either way depending on what market we are aiming him at...but are always honest and will turn down riders that we think are not an appropriate match for the horse. Had to do that with two interested individiuals for the bay roan gelding we just had. Only kind of horse that won't be pushed if it is borderline is a kids horse. If its a kids horse, we'll list it as such. If not we'll list it as well-broke. Period. For the same reason we don't negotiate on the price of kids horses....how much is your child worth? All others...negotiable..
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