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Discuss Fly Sprays - the dangers we should know about at the Horse Chat forum - Horse Forums.

I know we had a thread a while back where some people were debating over ...
  1. #1
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    Exclamation Fly Sprays - the dangers we should know about

    I know we had a thread a while back where some people were debating over the lables on some of the fly sprays, and if there were really important, some people were even using certain horse fly sprays on themselves. I never used to really read or care about the lables on things and happily spray whatever worked. This summer I have gone for a natural fly spray, one that only keeps the flies away rather than attacks its nervious system.

    Yesterday I read in the national paper that research was going on in the USA on Parkinson's disease and its link to using fly sprays. I got a couple of articles off of the net.

    I know some people will say "well its never hurt me in X years", but hopefully it will just make people think before going for the 'Most effective Kill 'em" sprays. (the information is from the internet and news papers so you will have to weigh it up yourself as to how much salt it holds) I just thought I would give you a warning about the possibility.

    Recent study at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Researchers there compared 496 newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease patients with 541 people who did not have the disease. Their main conclusion was that exposure to home and garden pesticides significantly increases the chance of contracting this debilitating and incurable neurological disease, which afflicts more than 500,000 Americans, including Muhammad Ali and Michael J. Fox. According to the study, people exposed to insecticides in the home are 70 percent more likely to develop Parkinson's than those who have not been exposed; exposure to garden insecticides increases the risk of contracting the disease by 50 percent. Among herbicide users, the odds rise according to the number of days the products have been used. In the study, fungicides posed no hazard. "At this time, no specific guidelines regarding avoidance of pesticides can be given," says Dr. Lorene Nelson, a neuroepidemiologist and the leader of the research team. "But this is an area of public health importance that needs to be pursued with additional studies." --Sydney Horton

    Horsewoman in Texas with severe Neuromuscular Disease wonders about the Pyrethrin fly sprays
    I am a 53 year old horsewoman who has used pyrethrins in our riding academy for 10 years. WE installed an overhead spray system that we were told was totally safe for horses and people...only attacked the nervous system of flies.
    We have also used concentrated forms of pyrethrins mixed for use in hand sprayers for horse's legs. In June of this year, we began using an oil based form for the legs...the flies seemed to be developing an immunity to the water-based forms.
    Within 6 weeks of using the oil based form (I would not allow my students to apply this...even though the warning said nothing about using gloves...just wash hands after use) I began to have trouble with my right foot dragging. I began to stumble, then started falling.
    I now have a neuro-muscular degenerative disease that no one can diagnose. I have seen 3 neurologists...am going to another one next week....I use a walker and am loosing the use of my right hand.
    There are two doctors that believe my condition is related to the exposure to pyrethrins. One of them is a horseman and believes the school horses that are stumbling for seemingly no reason, are also victims of the neurological effect of the pyrethrins.
    If the "natural" pesticide paralyzes the nervous system of flies and causes paralysis and arrhythmia. in rats....does it not seem logical that with prolonged exposure, humans could likewise be affected. The poison control center in our area of Texas notes that with prolonged and heavy exposure, pyrethrins can cause the loss of use of the lower limbs in humans.
    What do you know about this possible correlation?
    Judith Becker
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    Response from Dr. Janette Sherman:
    The woman has it correct. Pyrethrins kill insects (and anything else) by damaging the nervous system. The fact that she and her horses have received continuing doses of pyrethrins is reason enough for their neuropathy.
    STOP using it....
    Will they recover - probably unlikely, but let us hope it will not get worse.
    If the company failed to warn of the dangers, there may be a legal claim.
    I hope this helps.
    JDS
    Response from Dr. Robert Simon:
    You need to look at the label and MSDS (material safety data sheet) for this product. Oil based pyrethrins usually contain PBO (piperonyl butoxide, an oil that is a synergist) and MGK-264, another synergist. In combination with pyrethroids (all pyrethrins are now synthetic, NOT natural products) PBO and MGK 264 provide a very powerful neurological poison combination. Your symptoms and those of the horses are very similar to a Florida horse farm where the worker died and many horses died using similar products. If you fax me the label and/or MSDS I can take a look at it. You should stop all use of this product immediately. Also the persistence of these pryethrins with PBO is years. The pest control companies have many lies that these products are safe and natural. All such talk is false. These chemicals also attach the immune and pulmonary systems. You need not only a good neurologist but a good immunologist.
    RK Simon, Ph.D.

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    My name is Jamie. I am a 47yo nurse that was exposed to a horse fly insecticide last year that resulted in irritable laryngospasms. I sprayed the "stuff" out in the corral after my horse had had surgery to remove a parasite from flys. I had used this product for a couple of years and without any adverse reactions other than my horse losing some of her hair if I used it too frequently. This time I was spraying it on her fly mask before I even put the mask on her. I did it about 2 time a day for fly control. I felt we were out in the open so we were well ventilated.
    # days later I collapsed at work and was worked up for an aneurysm, abdominal migraine, asthma. throat cancer and a host of other things ... not poisoning. You see my airway would just close off and I couldn't get any air in to my lungs. Breathing was very difficult and nausea would follow. I told the doctor's that is what I thought it was but it wasn't until the second admission 2 days later that they investigated the possibility of chemical reaction. I was treated like I was "crazy" when they had an allergy specialist evaluate me. He thought there wasn't an anaphylactic reaction or inflammation or any kind. Then an ear nose and throat specialist came to evaluate and he knew right off the bat what it was. He had even written a paper on the subject. So for months I fought the spasm and was told only go to the ER if you absolutely have to. They will intubate you and cause more damage to an already overly sensitive larynx. So I stayed in my home very rarely going outside and trying hard not to expose myself to anything! I had to quit working in the hospital and couldn't drive any where due to car exhaust causing spasms.
    Now 10 months later I have had to have a tracheotomy put in so that when the spasms get so bad that I am ready to pass out I can open the trach and breathe through it until the spasms pass. It has been quite a learning experience for me being a nurse and all. I wouldn't even want to try to imagine how someone without medical background could handle this. It is terrifying to me and I an a Recovery Room nurse that deals with airways all of the time!!. Hopefully this trach will give my body the rest and recovery it needs to get over this. We are all hoping this isn't permanent but we will have to wait and see.
    If there is anyone that has this problem and would like to talk I would be more than glad to share and relate whatever we can. Like I said, I can only imagine how someone without the background could go through this
    Sincerely, Jamie Carrell JC4MEAZ@aol.com.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    There are many options that you can use that are safe for you and your horse

    Fly sheets & masks
    EQyss Marigold spray ( I am sure that you have other sprays over there that are also safe) Here is a link to some that state they are safe to use
    http://www.safe2use.com/products.htm
    HORSE OWNER: a person who has photographs in their wallet where their money used to be.

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    Senior Member+ BestofPrincess's Avatar
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    sooo basicly I should stop fly spraying my self now?
    I miss you princess
    there where horses now there are kids

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    You can use fly sprays Just check what they have in them. if they have a label that says wash hands after use then IMHO Don't use it. Pyrethrin is one of the ingredients that are really bad and I would avoid.
    HORSE OWNER: a person who has photographs in their wallet where their money used to be.

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    Great info Bailey. I will definately think twice before I use bug sprays again.

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    what fly spray do you use then? i make my own, using citronella oil, tea bags, sugar and vinegar. i got the recipe from a horsy magazine, and at night when the midges are about i use dilute lavender oil, which really does work!

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    Senior Member LateBloomer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by belle4
    Great info Bailey. I will definately think twice before I use bug sprays again.
    ditto. I currently use "Flicks" . Supposed to be natural.

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...2-00b0d0204ae5


    This definitely will make me read labels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by equi_babe_89
    what fly spray do you use then? i make my own, using citronella oil, tea bags, sugar and vinegar. i got the recipe from a horsy magazine, and at night when the midges are about i use dilute lavender oil, which really does work!
    that sounds more like a cake LOL!! only kidding with you I know a lot of people make their own. Citronella is one ingredients that has now been withdrawn from fly sprays in the uk .. Good old EEC I could never use it on my boy though as he would blow up the size of a hippo with it.

    I use Marigold spray, and spray it on myself when I go out into the fields in the evenings. It really does seem to keep the midges away
    HORSE OWNER: a person who has photographs in their wallet where their money used to be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LateBloomer
    ditto. I currently use "Flicks" . Supposed to be natural.

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.h...2-00b0d0204ae5


    This definitely will make me read labels.
    That sounds good LB Thanks for posting another alternative to the chemical ones
    HORSE OWNER: a person who has photographs in their wallet where their money used to be.

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    Given that I have an allergy to chemicals (severe headaches, shortness of breath, abdominal pain and vomiting when exposed to them) I use fly masks and blankets to keep flies off the horses, and long clothes for myself.

    Chemicals that affect me severely are fly sprays and glysophate (roundup). I think too many people these days are lax in the safe use of chemicals given their daily usage, believing them to be safe.
    "If your brain was elastic you wouldn't have enough to make a garter for a canary" (Prisoner, an Aussie tv show)

    "It's probably the worst idea since Hitler's dad said to Hitler's mum 'come up stairs Brunhilda-I'm feeling saucy tonight!'"

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    very true Chester ... to many of us don't care about what we use and then we reach 50 and get told we have cancer, and we reply "but I have never smoked"
    HORSE OWNER: a person who has photographs in their wallet where their money used to be.

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