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Discuss Droped Fetlocks? Help PLEASE! at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.

Originally Posted by cowboys_cowgurl I am not looking for something to cure it...just looking to ...
  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboys_cowgurl View Post
    I am not looking for something to cure it...just looking to make him more comfortable for years to come.
    Unfortunately, there is nothing. We manage the pathology as best we can and in time, our best is just not enough.
    I mean, for his fetlocks to drop so drasticly so soon, its heart breaking.
    So long as his quality of life seems to be adequate, you deal with it as such. At some point, that quality of life will be gone and it is then that we, as responsible stewards of our horses, do the right thing and feel good about having the ability and compassion to remove the pain, remove the suffering regardless of the costs to us personally.

    Far too often I see people selfishly keeping an animal alive rather than selflessly doing what is right, proper and best for that animal.

    And I've got a pet cemetary in my back yard that stands in mute testimony with regard to my actions to do what is right for the animals entrusted to my care when, regardless of the personal pain I may suffer, it is time to afford them death with dignity and the dignity of death.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RickB. View Post
    Far too often I see people selfishly keeping an animal alive rather than selflessly doing what is right, proper and best for that animal.

    And I've got a pet cemetary in my back yard that stands in mute testimony with regard to my actions to do what is right for the animals entrusted to my care when, regardless of the personal pain I may suffer, it is time to afford them death with dignity and the dignity of death.
    No truer words are spoken.

    I have watched a friend of mine not be able to put a horse down when the mare needed it, nor would she call the vet out to help the horse because she knew what the vet would say. It was not until the very last moment (it took months to get to this point) when she woke up one morning and the mare was in absolute misery collapsed on the ground when my friend decided it was time. She did this same thing with a dog that had numerous diabetic complications. The dog died on its own a very slow and painful death. She is doing the exact same thing with another geriatric horse that has severe kidney problems.

    My friend is the kindest, dearest person, but she lets these animals die the way they do because "she cannot bear to have them put down." It sickens me to see that she puts her own feelings above the animal's pain. So very selfish.

    If you (and this is a general, cumulative "you", not anyone in particular) cannot make your animal comfortable anymore. It is time to let them go.

  3. #13
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    help for dropped fetlocks/dsld

    Yes, there is a treatment available that may help your horse remain comfortable for some time.

    http://dsldequine.info/
    information for diagnosis, care, mangement, case histories, and special vet pages

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DSLD-equine/
    group message board for exchange of information, raising awareness


    http://www.biomedcentral.com/content...-6148-2-12.pdf Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis as a systemic disorder characterized by proteoglycan accumulation. This is the latest published findings by University of Georgia's Dr Halper and team.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YXTxvTEJFo"]YouTube - Equine DSLD-ESPA[/ame] video

    http://marimbatlb.blogspot.com/

    for info on coonfoot/low pasterns/fallen fetlocks


  4. #14
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    I must also agree that though DSLD can be managed and maintained pain free for only a period of time. This is a progressive disease and will not get better. Close management and helpful nutraceuticles and pharmaceuticls may keep the horse pain free and well mantained for an unknown length of time. Once the progression has gone so far when nothing seems to help in pain and quality of life the question remains of what is humane and what is not. One good thing we humans have the right to do is to end the suffering of those animals that only see pain and misery in thier futures. Good stewards of animal care alone is not always easy and can be heart wrenching, soul gutting and ever so painful. But I like knowing that I can end the sufferings of those who definatly deserve to die with dignaty.

    Support boots if applied correctly can give a certain amount of support to the tendons and ligaments to aid in the pressures and swellings of the area affected. Weaver has an excellant set of support boots that have a sling that goes under the fetlock joint and can be adjusted by itself with out having to remove the boot. Just like with any type of wrap, boot or what have you it needs to be put on correctly. I have a pair of bots that are similar but the sling part is attatched to the boot and not a seperate peice. I have found them to be very supportive in the entire length of the lower leg and fetlock joint. I also use track bandages instead of polo wraps. I find them easier to keep equal pressure on them while wrapping. I also like how they conform to the leg nicely and when applied properly have a nice support with the fetlock joint and tendons.
    I have often turned horses out with protective boots and support type boots and if they are applied properly, are in good condition and fit well there should be no hazards using them. I dont realy care about using polo wraps or other wraps when turned out in pasture. I use protection boots or support depending on the horse.


    (I could only get a minute of the video and That gray horse has more problems than just fetlock and pasterns.........Extremely post legged. )
    Last edited by Native Winds; 09-19-2009 at 10:26 PM.
    "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated" Mahatma Gandhi

    "....Nature is cruel but we dont have to be." Temple Grandin


    "Trust No One" x-files

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgolshani View Post
    Yes, there is a treatment available that may help your horse remain comfortable for some time.
    From the referenced website(emphasis, mine):
    "
    There is no cure for dsld at this time but with pain management and diet changes you may be able to keep your horse more comfortable and perhaps slow the process. There is no solid proof of this yet,....."

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