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Discuss At home fecals....the Eggzamin System at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.

For $450 you too can do your own fecals at home. http://eggzamin.com/purchase/ I can't watch ...
  1. #1
    Senior Member+ Long Leaf's Avatar
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    At home fecals....the Eggzamin System

    For $450 you too can do your own fecals at home.

    http://eggzamin.com/purchase/

    I can't watch the video because of my nazi ISP - Hughesnet - but it does look like it's quantitative float (somewhat considering there's no centrifugation). I do fecals twice yearly at $25/horse = $250/year and despite the fact that I was a licensed vet tech for 15 years and feel confident that I could run / read this test, I like knowing that my fecal results were run by lab professionals at a veterinary college.

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    I recently bought this kit and love it! It has saved me a lot of money and helped me to get a better picture of what is going on inside each individual horse.

    The McMaster FEC technique is a quantitative test that is utilized by most veterinary diagnostic labs including Idexx and a majority of the universities.

    Centrifugation using the Wisconsin sugar method is more sensitive but requires more time and money. Additionally, since we are only trying to get a general picture of the worm burdern we donít need to know if there are less than 25 eggs per gram (sensitivity cut off for McMaster technique). The recommendation is to treat with dewormer when your egg counts are >200 so who cares about a possible variation of 25 in each direction?

    I used to work in a veterinary diagnostic lab in the southeast and this is the "gold standard" test that we used for submitted samples.

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    "It is always preferable to use a centrifugation flotation technique. This is probably the single most important change you can make to improve routine recovery of parasite stages by flotation. Flotation methods not utilizing a centrifugation technique are often not sensitive enough to recover small numbers of organisms in the feces."--Stanley L. Marks, BVSc, PhD, Dip. ACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), Dip. ACVN 2002 proceedings on "What Constitutes a Proper Fecal Examination?" (snagged from a post Ryle made on this very issue)

    Flotation only tells you there are parasites present. It does not give you a representation of numbers involved. Flotation can miss at much as 20% of eggs in a sample - it's not a matter of a specific count of missing 25 eggs. That 20% can be the difference between needing to deworming, and deciding to wait.
    He who thinks he can do everything or knows everything has already reached the beginning of the end.
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    Dr. Stanley L. Marks is a small animal veterinarian and yes, centrifugation is always recommended for small animals because they carry zoonotic parasites and missing a Toxocara or Hookworm egg could result in human illness.

    However, all equine parasitologists including:
    Dr. CRAIG REINEMEYER, DVM, PHD
    Dr. DENNIS FRENCH, DVM, MS, DIPL. ABVP
    Dr. RAY KAPLAN, DVM, PHD

    recommend that routine FEC's be done using the McMaster technique because if a if a horseís parasite burden is such that deworming is warranted, the McMaster method provides more than sufficient sensitivity.

    We have been using dewormers incorrectly for years, resulting in over 40% of researched farms having drug-resistant parasites. We need to change our thinking about parasites and realize that grazing animals need a mild parasite burden to develop immunity. If we have count that warrants deworming, a McMaster's test will identify that because the count will be over 25!

    http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites0604.pdf


    http://www.thebarnworks.com/download...rming-2010.pdf


    http://www.veterinarypracticenews.co...e-upswing.aspx





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    agree on the resistance issue. I just disagree on a floatation being all that's needed.
    He who thinks he can do everything or knows everything has already reached the beginning of the end.
    -- The Rothenberger Family

    - JB Acres, owned and operated by Dynamite animals.
    Barn Swallow Jewelry on Artfire!

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    As long as people are doing FECs, I don't care how they are doing them! We will just agree to disagree

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    I can tell you from first-hand experience that a floatation can be very wrong. You can sample a single pile of feces and have a high parasite egg count and then sample that same pile and have a negative egg count.

    Centrifugation greatly increases the accuracy of fecal testing and if you are going to bother testing and using it as a method for determining need for deworming it only makes sense to use the most accurate method otherwise you are doing little good. The sensitivity of centrifugation is ~ 1 EPG compared to ~25 EPG for the McMaster technique. This is a rather large discrepency.
    Cindy D.
    Licensed Veterinary Technician, TX
    Member American Assoc. of Equine Veterinary Technicians

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    Fecal Testing

    A friend at my barn has the Eggzamin fecal tester. I asked her about the accuracy question because I want her to start testing my horse too. She mentioned that she is testing to decide if we need to worm - so if the horse has a count of 25 or less it doesn't matter. She watches for when her guy has a count over 200 - it hasn't happened. I guess that makes sense to me. If I need to worm my mare after a 200 count does it matter if they have a count less than 25?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryle View Post
    I can tell you from first-hand experience that a floatation can be very wrong. You can sample a single pile of feces and have a high parasite egg count and then sample that same pile and have a negative egg count.

    Centrifugation greatly increases the accuracy of fecal testing and if you are going to bother testing and using it as a method for determining need for deworming it only makes sense to use the most accurate method otherwise you are doing little good. The sensitivity of centrifugation is ~ 1 EPG compared to ~25 EPG for the McMaster technique. This is a rather large discrepency.
    When you look at it from a management aspect it is not a large standard of error. Since we should only be treating horses with FECs under 200 the McMasters technique if sufficient. I see that you are an AAEVT member, the AAEP stands behind McMasters fecal egg counts. I am sure you can find that info on their site.

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