Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Discuss anhydrosis.... at the Horse Health forum - Horse Forums.

We are starting to think that my mare has this or is esntialy a non ...
  1. #1
    Senior Member+ BestofPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA ca
    Posts
    5,316
    Blog Entries
    14

    Exclamation anhydrosis....

    We are starting to think that my mare has this or is esntialy a non sweater. I rode her this morning and it is like 82 degrees out and 70% humidity and I was sweating, but she had no sweat on her when all was said and done, neither did her colt but he was still cool to the thouch, but she was hot! So I rensed her off. But this has all been going on for a while, and she normal sweats, but this year she's tyed up, gotten hives tooo many times. And she has now developed a rash, also yesterday when every horse in the field she was in was very sweaty she was dry. Is there any thing I can do for this? she's on electrolites and hhas free choice salt and mineral blocks and has 3 buckets of water.
    Last edited by BestofPrincess; 07-18-2005 at 06:20 AM.
    I miss you princess
    there where horses now there are kids

  2. #2
    Senior Member+
    3WishesDun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    At My Wit's End
    Posts
    18,133
    Blog Entries
    27
    BoP- Have you called the vet in to take a look at her? Here is some info....


    You Can Lead a Horse to Water…
    Anhydrosis in Horses


    By Leesa Nacht of J&M Consulting
    Providing Information for the Equine Industry

    It's a familiar sight in the summer months, especially around the racetrack: a horse that is dripping with sweat and blowing hard, working at cooling off his body after the workout. But thermoregulation involves more than just sweating. The body also systematically moves blood from the inner (hot) core to the outer (cooler) surfaces of the skin. Blood flow, panting, sweating; all of these mechanisms work together to cool the horse, but sweating is the predominant method. The horse is the only mammal, other than humans, that cools himself by sweating. As the body heats up from exercise, sweat is produced, which evaporates from the skin resulting in a lower body temperature. Even short term, submaximal exercise can cause an increase in body temperatures. Once internal body temperatures rise to above 105o F, heat stroke and other thermal-related injuries become an issue. In hot weather, always ensure that there is an ample supply of water, to allow conversion of moisture within the body to perspiration.

    But what about the horse that doesn't have this efficient cooling system? The inability to sweat in response to work and/or body temperature increases is called anhydrosis. Horses with this affliction are also referred to as dry coated, puffers, or non-sweaters. Anhydrosis can develop suddenly or slowly over a period of time, and is usually, but not always, seen in athletic horses. This is likely due to the greater levels of exertion; therefore an increased occasion for expected profuse sweating. Generally, it is found in horses that are raised in cooler climatic areas and then shipped south to regions that have high temperatures and high humidity. It is estimated that 20% - 30% of horses in these southern regions are anhydrotic to some degree.

    Anhydrosis was first documented in the 1920's, when the British began to send their horses to Indonesia, Malaysia, India, and other tropical and sub-tropical countries. This problem is most common in Thoroughbreds, but this may be related to the type of intense exercise (short duration, high intensity) that most Thoroughbreds are engaged in. Recently, there has been an increase seen in the incidence of anhydrosis in Quarter Horses, but it is being surmised that this may be due to the increase of Thoroughbred blood in the Quarter Horse bloodlines.

    A horse can also be known as a shy sweater, or one that sweats lightly compared to what a trainer may expect for the level of exercise. The amount that they sweat is not enough to properly cool the body. Usually the first sign of a problem with a shy sweater is a decrease in the level of performance, possibly with some panting. In extremely hot, and humid conditions, you can help to cool a horse, anhydrotic or not, by using a misting machine. These devices can lower the ambient temperature by as much as 15o F, making recovery easier, but still not addressing the underlying condition.

    A study done by the University of Florida revealed some interesting data. A large group of horses from the Central Florida area were surveyed. Apparently, not only working horses can be affected. The results showed a percentage of each various category of Thoroughbreds suffered from anhydrosis. The incidence was greatest in training horses, then non-pregnant mares, pregnant mares, stallions, and the lowest level of occurrence showing up in youngsters. Though no explanation was given for the variation, this work may lead to future keys to solving the problem.

    There are a variety of signs to look for in an anhydrotic horse. Other than the obvious inability to sweat, they will show an increased heart rate, increased respiratory rate, higher body temperature (as high as 108oF) and a decreased tolerance for exercise. Panting is also a common sign, with as high as 150 breaths per minute for as long as 2-3 hours post-exercise. Horses that suffer will exhibit hair loss, especially around their face, and a dull, rough hair coat. The skin becomes dry, flaky, and itchy because body oils are not brought to the surface of the skin through the usual sweating mechanisms.

    There is a test that can sometimes help in the diagnosis of a non-sweater. Epinephrine is injected into the horse's skin. This mild dose of adrenal gland hormone will cause a normal, healthy horse to break into a sweat in the injection area. An anhydrotic horse will show no response. The problem with this test is that there is a wide range of results between individuals and these results could also be influenced by the ambient weather conditions.

    Ralph Beadle, DVM, PhD., from Louisiana State University has spent many years working on the possible cause(s) of anhydrosis. It has been suggested that epinephrine could be related. First, one needs to understand how the sweat glands work inside the body. Each sweat gland has beta-2-receptors. These receptors cause the gland to react when stimulated and the result is that the horse perspires. Epinephrine is one stimulus to this system, and another possibility is through nerves. Dr. Beadle believes it is a stress-related issue.

    Increased stress in the body can cause a down-regulation or desensitization of the beta-2-receptors in the sweat glands. This is basically a shutting-off of the normal process of balance or homeostasis in the body. Some big stressors would include heat and humidity. It is possible, that for some reason, the body releases too much epinephrine. With the continually high levels, the beta-2-receptors will stop responding for a while. Once in cooler weather, the receptors will up-regulate and the horse will once again sweat normally.

    There are some nutritional factors that seem to apply to these horses as well. They sometimes exhibit an electrolyte imbalance. Low amounts of sodium, chloride, and potassium are found in the diets, and this can be easily remedied. It is common to find that anhidrotic horses suffer from hyponatremia (low sodium levels in the blood) and hypochloremia (low chloride levels in the blood).

    Unfortunately, electrolyte supplementation does not help all of these horses, and prophylactic use doesn't seem to make a difference. There has also been some relief seen with the administration of thyroxine and casein, but again, with no consistency. To date, the best and most consistent results are achieved by sending these horses into cooler climates. To continue to exercise them as non-sweaters is taking a huge risk, inviting heat stroke and death. Until a definite cause and cure can be found, careful management is the only thing that can be done.




    Madness takes its toll.
    Please have exact change.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
    -Frost
    I've Been Snowballed!

  3. #3
    Senior Member+
    3WishesDun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    At My Wit's End
    Posts
    18,133
    Blog Entries
    27
    and some signs from the same article...

    Anhydrosis

    The horse is the only mammal, other than humans, that cools himself by sweating.

    Once internal body temperatures rise to above 105o F, heat stroke and other thermal-related injuries become an issue

    The inability to sweat in response to work and/or body temperature increases is called anhydrosis.

    Horses with this affliction are also referred to as dry coated, puffers, or non-sweaters.


    It is estimated that 20% - 30% of horses in southern regions are anhydrotic to some degree.

    Usually the first sign of a problem with a shy sweater is a decrease in the level of performance, possibly with some panting.



    Signs of an anhydrotic horse.
    1.Inability to sweat
    2.Increased heart rate.
    3.Increased respiratory rate.
    4.Higher body temperature (as high as 108oF)
    5.Decreased tolerance for exercise.
    6.Panting is also a common sign
    7.Hair loss,
    8.Dull, rough hair coat.
    9.Skin becomes dry, flaky, and itchy
    Madness takes its toll.
    Please have exact change.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
    -Frost
    I've Been Snowballed!

  4. #4
    Senior Member+ BestofPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA ca
    Posts
    5,316
    Blog Entries
    14
    Signs of an anhydrotic horse.
    1.Inability to sweat---- I think she is more of a shy sweater
    5.Decreased tolerance for exercise. --- she is slower to move off than before but not alot compared to a normal horse, but then again she usually is one that is very up and ready to go, she still is just a little more hesident
    7.Hair loss, yes over her hind end, by her point of hip
    9.Skin becomes dry, flaky, and itchy no flaking, itchy but could be from hives,I havent seen any noticable dry skin.
    When she tyed up she was low in potasium, this morning she only got a little sweat around the girth, when normaly even in less humid mornings she will at least get sweaty under the saddle and neck. She is 13yrs old, current moment a broodmare. She was moved from the bay area of california (she was born and raised in CA) to hot humid and cold Maryland when she was 10yrs old.
    I miss you princess
    there where horses now there are kids

  5. #5
    Senior Member+
    3WishesDun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    At My Wit's End
    Posts
    18,133
    Blog Entries
    27
    I hope you figure out what's going on with her....perhaps its not Anhydrosis...
    Good Luck!!!!!


    April
    Madness takes its toll.
    Please have exact change.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
    -Frost
    I've Been Snowballed!

  6. #6
    Senior Member+ BestofPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA ca
    Posts
    5,316
    Blog Entries
    14
    any one else have any info on it?
    I miss you princess
    there where horses now there are kids

  7. #7
    Senior Member+
    spyro1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The Swamp~Go Gators
    Posts
    7,304
    Blog Entries
    21
    I think that everyone pretty much covered the facts above.
    I will add that I did know someone who had a non sweater and she swore by giving the horse a *green* beer daily. Something about the hops and barley started the mare sweating again. there is also a supp out called ONE AC (pretty sure that is what it is called)
    I believe that either you control your attitude, or it controls you.


  8. #8
    Senior Member+ BestofPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA ca
    Posts
    5,316
    Blog Entries
    14
    ya my friend with a filly who didnt sweat used one ac with great results, the beer thing my trainer did with her old horse, but my mare is...better be pregnant
    I miss you princess
    there where horses now there are kids

  9. #9
    Senior Member+ BestofPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA ca
    Posts
    5,316
    Blog Entries
    14
    seriously this is important
    I miss you princess
    there where horses now there are kids

  10. #10
    Senior Member+ probarrelracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    2,309
    Try One AC. It sometimes works. If you do not show, you can give 10 cc of clenbuterol before you ride. This will get them to sweat if the glands are working. If this does not get her sweating, then it is a gland malfunction, and not neurotransmitters gone bad. Keep her as cool as possible. Do not put her in a situation that will cause her to overheat. Plenty of FRESH water. You can try calling at Josey Ranch. I heard there is a woman there (forgot her name) who used volcanic ash or something on a horse that had been anhydrotic for about 10 years. Got him soaking right away.
    Help a friend to turn his frown upside down. Just rip his head off, and flip it over!

    He who says that you only have yourself to blame never learned to blame other people!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Anhydrosis
    By ColtysHeart in forum Horse Health
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-30-2004, 12:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •