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Author Topic: How Tall??
gallop3337
Member
Member # 509

posted November 20, 2003 03:41 PM        
Hey everyone, I haven't posted much here, but you all seem nice and informative. I have a question about my appaloosa filly. I bought her in August and was wondering how tall she might be. She will be 2 years old in April and she is already 14.1 hands high. She is part quarter horse but shows all the appaloosa traits. Could anyone tell me how tall she will get and when she will stop growing? Your input would be appreciated. Thanks!

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Speak your mind, but ride a fast horse.

Posts: 359 | From: Wisconsin | Registered: Aug 2003
Blistering Winds
Member
Member # 843

posted November 20, 2003 03:48 PM        
Well, since she is "stock-horse" in breeding, and she's 14'1 now, I would probably expect between 14.2 - 15 hands. Though, she could suprise you. Most slow way down at 2, growing maybe a hand more between 2 and 6 years of age.

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Horses should not be treated as people. They should be respected for who they are and what they are capable of doing!

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Posts: 4337 | From: Texas | Registered: Oct 2003
spyro1
Member
Member # 647

posted November 20, 2003 04:23 PM        
Hey:) Apps are great:) How is she bred? My quarter horse was 14 hands as a 2 year old and I thought he would never grow!! he is now 4 and stands 15 hands:) Some of it may be genetics with your filly too. I think that in general, some stock breeds reach teh 15 hand mark, some are bred to be taller, some shorter. Do you know how tall her parents were and her breeding?? Also, little tid bit for you guys, did you know that quarter horses are really *crop out* apps??

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Posts: 2755 | From: Sunny South Florida | Registered: Aug 2003
gallop3337
Member
Member # 509

posted November 20, 2003 04:58 PM        
Hey, thanks for the info, I was afraid she would get huge! I have never seen her parents, but her sire is the appaloosa, Ivory Silhouette and her Dam is QH Nicks Classic Doll. I have never heard of either, but I wonder if she has some racing blood on the QH side. Her Grand sire and Grand dam on the bottom are Nicks Top Price and Go Foolish Doll. I couldn't find any info on them on the AQHA site. Once again thanks for replying [Big Grin]

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Speak your mind, but ride a fast horse.

Posts: 359 | From: Wisconsin | Registered: Aug 2003
Sandra-A1
Member
Member # 588

posted November 20, 2003 05:04 PM        
There is a way you can measure that will give you some sort of idea.
It sometimes comes close. You measure from the elbow to mid fetlock and then invert the tape to see how many more inches above the wither the horse will grow.

I also found the following bit of information online. I hope it helps:

"I've never seen a horse mature at 2 years of age. It's just not physically possible. TTT -- Things Take Time. A physically mature two-year-old horse would be like a healthy baby born after a three-month pregnancy! I have seen horses that have been fed too much, too early, in an attempt to make them grow faster, and some of those horses have achieved most of their mature HEIGHT by age 2. Generally, though, this happens at the expense of bone quality and joint soundness, so it's not something to try to achieve deliberately -- and even racehorses, which are often pushed to become as large as possible for the yearling sales, generally gain another inch in height by the time they are six or seven.

I can't really predict where your horse will end up, height-wise, especially given the lack of family history.

Here are some thoughts that may help.

Horses can be made to reach their full height earlier than they would normally, but they can't be made to get TALLER than their genetic programming allows.

Small horses grow proportionately -- 5% of a 14.2hh horse's height is a smaller amount than the same 5% of a 16.0hh horse's height. Your horse is probably growing nicely, according to schedule -- but it's his own genetic schedule he's going to follow, not your plans. :-(

I've always had good luck picking foals out of pastures and predicting which ones would become really tall and which ones wouldn't, and here's my secret: I look at their body balance. If a young foal looks like a tiny version of an adult horse, it's probably going to be a small horse when it's full-grown. If a young foal reaches the age of two without having gone through an awkward, gangly stage, it's probably going to be a small horse when it's full-grown. The gangly and awkward ones that first seem to have huge heads and huge joints, then grow up one end at a time, first croup-high, then high in front, then croup-high again, and that go through a stage during which they look long and bony and uncoordinated -- those are the ones that will probably be tall when they are full-grown. This would tie in with your source that mentioned a small head indicating early maturity -- it doesn't mean that the horse will actually be physically mature earlier, you'll still need to wait for the skeleton to finish developing. But I would interpret that statement as meaning that a foal that develops adult proportions very early is a foal that is going to grow up to be a small horse.

When one of my foals (out of a 15.3hh mare, by a 16.2hh stallion) was born looking like a tiny horse, I knew that she wasn't going to be taller than her mother. By the time she was two, she had never had an awkward DAY, and I knew that she might reach 15. 2hh -- or not. She just made it, but not until she was a full seven years old. She was a crossbred and could just as easily have been taller than either parent at maturity -- but she wasn't programmed that way. And she's a very good mare. :-)"


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"It is our choices Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities."
-Dumbledore

Posts: 1863 | From: Alabama | Registered: Aug 2003
SeattleSlew_Grandson
Junior Member
Member # 968

posted November 25, 2003 02:19 PM        
is it true that if a stud is cut to a gelding...that they stop growing???? like if my horse wasnt cut would be be taller than he is now?

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*If you put your mind to it, you can do anything*

Posts: 16 | From: College Station, Texas | Registered: Nov 2003
Blistering Winds
Member
Member # 843

posted November 25, 2003 02:28 PM        
No, not true at all. Horse's Genetics are set. Regardless of whether they are cut early or late. There are a few things that are influenced by the testosterone production of a stud colt though. Thick neck and shoulders, and other "stallion" characteristics. Most characteristics over time eventually go away, but that's the only advantage to keep them a stud for a while.....but it's only temporary.

Though after they are gelded, they do kinda shoot up a bit more...but they would have reached it eventually as a stud.

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Horses should not be treated as people. They should be respected for who they are and what they are capable of doing!

Born Free Now Expensive

Posts: 4337 | From: Texas | Registered: Oct 2003
Sandra-A1
Member
Member # 588

posted November 27, 2003 04:26 PM        
It has been my experience that a colt that is gelded can have a longer growing period than one that remains entire.
We used to think that all the physical development was dependent on testosterone. However, that just isn't true. In fact, a colt gelded well before puberty is likely to be LARGER than he would have been if left entire, because testosterone causes maturation
of the bone-ends; cutting early allows the horse to continue growing longer. [Big Grin]

Studies have shown that delaying gelding to allow a colt to "get his growth" is a faulty method, since that hormone-induced fat (the crest) and muscle will all melt away after gelding anyway. [Wink]

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"It is our choices Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities."
-Dumbledore

Posts: 1863 | From: Alabama | Registered: Aug 2003
jrmorgan
Member
Member # 903

posted November 27, 2003 04:41 PM        
I don't know if there's any science behind it , but I always heard that stallions tended to be shorter and stockier while geldings tended to get taller and leaner....basically that a stud colt grows outward more and a gelding colt grows upward more, lol...

I do know that testosterone is partially responsible for a big round jaw on a horse and that horses that are gelded later tend to have a bigger, prettier jaw than horses who are gelded very early.

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"If it's not controversial, its probably not worth saying."

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Posts: 352 | From: Texas | Registered: Oct 2003


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